Utah State’s Savon Scarver Named Consensus All-American

first_img Tags: All-American/Savon Scarver/Utah State Aggies Football December 13, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah State’s Savon Scarver Named Consensus All-American FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah – Utah State’s Savon Scarver was named a consensus All-America as a returner/all-purpose player on Thursday.Scarver joins tackle Merlin Olsen (1961) and defensive end Phil Olsen (1969) as Utah State’s only consensus All-Americans. He is also just the 16th player in Mountain West history to be named a consensus All-American.In all, 17 different schools from six conferences (including independents) were represented on the All-America team (a total of 27 players selected).The native of Las Vegas, Nev., received first-team All-America honors from two of the five outlets that comprise the NCAA Consensus All-America team in the Walter Camp Football Foundation and the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA).Utah State’s sophomore kickoff return specialist/wide receiver was also one of two Aggies to earn first-team all-Mountain West honors this season. The 5-foot-11, 185-pounder leads the nation in kickoff returns (34.2 ypr) and is tied for second with a pair of kickoff returns for touchdowns.Scarver has returned 21 kickoffs for 719 yards, including four returns of 50-or-more yards. His two kickoff returns for touchdowns (100 yards vs. New Mexico State and 96 yards at Wyoming) rank as the second-most in a single-season in school history, behind Kevin Robinson (three in 2007). In fact, Scarver and Robinson are the only Aggies in school history to have multiple kickoff returns for touchdowns in a single season.For his career, Scarver has three total kickoff returns for touchdowns, which is also second all-time in school history behind Robinson (four from 2004-07). Scarver’s career kickoff return average of 28.6 yards is the third-best in Utah State history.Scarver has played in all 12 games for the Aggies this season, recording eight catches for 147 yards and one touchdown. He has also rushed the ball once for 14 yards.Scarver and the Aggies will face North Texas in the 13th-annual Gildan New Mexico Bowl on Saturday, Dec. 15, at noon, at Dreamstyle Stadium in Albuquerque, N.M. The game will be televised live on ESPN.For Utah State, this will be its second appearance in the New Mexico Bowl as it posted a 21-6 win against UTEP in 2014. Only New Mexico (4) and Colorado State (3) have made more appearances in the Albuquerque-based bowl than USU (2).Utah State and North Texas will be meeting for the eighth time in series history as USU holds a 4-3 advantage. USU posted a 4-1 record against UNT when both teams were members of the Big West Conference from 1996-2000 and USU went 0-2 against the Mean Green when both programs were members of the Sun Belt Conference from 2003-04.Utah State, which is ranked No. 23 in this week’s Amway Coaches poll, finished the regular season at 10-2, including a 7-1 mark in the Mountain Division of the MW to tie for first. Written by Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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Goodlord offers help to ease agents’ cash-flow problems

first_imgAs property businesses feel the pressure of Corona virus, Goodlord has revealed details of a new scheme designed to ease cash flow pressures on letting agents and ensure they can continue to support new and existing customers throughout the pandemic. The scheme covers new transactions as well as offering free tenancy renewals.The Pay As You Get Paid option will allow agents to suspend their monthly subscription fee for access to the Goodlord platform and instead pay a set fee per transaction. This new offer is designed to support agents with their cash flow during this period and ensure they are in a strong position to capitalise on pent-up demand set to be released when social distancing rules are lifted.With tenancy renewals likely to be a focus of most lettings operations in the next few months, and with agents needing to handle the work remotely, the company is also making any tenancy renewals with a contracted date on or before 30 June 2020 free of charge via the Pay As You Get Paid option.Those who wish to transfer historic tenancies onto Goodlord in order to take advantage of the offer are able to do so.Goodlord says that it’s new structure aims to provide financial relief at this critical time and enable agents to offer streamlined, digital services that support their tenants and landlords and enable their operations to be handled remotely. The Pay As You Get Paid option will stay in place until partner businesses return to normal trading or 30th September 2020 – whichever happens soonerTom Mundy (left), COO at Goodlord, said, “As a company, we put our customers first. As a transactional business, Goodlord is also feeling the effects of Covid-19. However, our objective is to protect the long term relationships we have with our customers, and we’ve structured this offer to help us do that. We believe by working together in this way we’ll all come out of this stronger. We only win when our customers win.”Last week Goodlord’s Rental Protection Insurance product was updated to ensure claims can still be processed, despite new rules around evictions, protecting landlords from financial loss wherever possible. tenancy renewals Pay as you get paid lettings platform goodlord April 7, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » COVID-19 support » Goodlord offers help to ease agents’ cash-flow problems previous nextProducts & ServicesGoodlord offers help to ease agents’ cash-flow problemsCalled ‘Pay As You Get Paid’ the scheme includes, unofficially, a free T shirt sent out to all its contacts and customers to raise morale as well.Sheila Manchester7th April 20200666 Viewslast_img read more

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Government response: Clinical waste operator breaches environmental permits

first_img It is the company’s responsibility to clear its sites and operate legally. As the regulator, we have set out a timeline for clearance of the waste and are carrying out regular inspections at each of the company’s sites to monitor the situation. The Environment Agency has taken a range of action with the company to bring their sites back into compliance but they have repeatedly breached permits and continued to operate unlawfully. As a result, in addition to our enforcement activity to clear the sites, the EA has launched a criminal investigation. The offending sites are not accessible to the general public and there is no risk to public health or the environment. The Environment Agency has found Healthcare Environmental Services in breach of its environmental permits at 4 of its 6 sites which deal with clinical waste – by having more waste on site than their permit allows and storing waste inappropriately. As part of our enforcement activity, we have partially suspended the company’s permit at one of their sites. This will prevent them from accepting any more incinerator-only waste in order for them to clear the backlog of waste on-site. We are also progressing with enforcement action at the other non-compliant sites. We are supporting the government and the NHS to ensure there is no disruption to public services and alternative plans are put in place for hospitals affected to dispose of their waste safely. Further briefing: The Environment Agency has found Healthcare Environmental Services to be in breach of its environmental permits at sites which deal with clinical waste. We are taking enforcement action against the operator, which includes clearance of the excess waste, and have launched a criminal investigation. We are supporting the Government and the NHS to ensure there is no disruption to public services and for alternative plans to be put in place for hospitals affected to dispose of their waste safely. Healthcare Environmental Services, which services the NHS and operates six sites across England, has been found in breach of environmental permits by the Environment Agency (EA) .The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) is leading on the government response whilst the EA is taking enforcement action against the operator.An Environment Agency spokesperson said: There is industry wide agreement that overall there is sufficient incineration capacity. Incinerator shutdowns do occur for maintenance, but this is mostly planned and companies should have contingency plans in place. We have recently carried out an audit of permitted sites dealing with clinical waste which indicate a high level of compliance in this sector – the majority of sites are operating at the expected level or above. We are taking enforcement action against the operator to clear the excess waste from their sites and bring the company back into compliance with their permits.last_img read more

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Seniors end careers as part-time students

first_imgSome members of Notre Dame’s Class of 2011 will end their four-year college careers by completing their final semester at Notre Dame as part-time students. Assistant registrar Lora Spaulding said many seniors choose to become part-time students in order to save money on tuition. “If it’s a student’s last semester and they need less than 12 credit hours to graduate, they can discuss the possibility of becoming part-time with their academic dean,” Spaulding said. “We currently have 192 seniors enrolled as part-time, which in the grand scheme of things really isn’t that many.” Spaulding said tuition for part-time students is based on the number of credit hours they are taking during the semester. This semester, part-time students will pay $1,642 per credit hour, she said. According to Spaulding, seniors who enroll part-time are unable to live on campus, but still have student IDs and continue to have the same opportunities that full-time students have. “Part-time students can still go to Rolfs and can still have a meal plan, if they choose to do so,” she said. Senior Allie Colaco, a biology major, said she is taking just one class as a part-time student this semester. “I had the credits, so I figured I might as well save the money,” she said. As a part-time student, Colaco said she will fill up some of her free time by working in a lab and serving as a teaching assistant (TA) in undergraduate science classes. Senior Kevin Ritt said he didn’t initially plan on becoming a part-time student this semester. “The idea of being part-time hadn’t really occurred to me, but my parents asked if I would mind doing it to save them some money,” Ritt said. “I have two brothers, one who just graduated, and one who is a sophomore in college, so the option of saving some cash was very appealing to them, and, frankly, the idea of only having one class didn’t bother me too much either.” Ritt said he is especially looking forward to having more free time. “I’m going to spend my time looking for a job after graduation, working out, and trying to hang out with my friends as much as possible before we all scatter after graduation,” he said. “I also expect to be outrageously good at video games by the end of this semester.”last_img read more

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Colombian Ministry of Defense Signs Agreement with NATO to Strengthen Fight against Corruption

first_imgBy General Command, Armed Forces of Colombia August 03, 2016 As part of a policy of transparency and the fight against corruption, the Colombian Ministry of National Defense signed a Transparency and Institutional Integrity Agreement on August 2nd in Bogotá. The agreement will formalize a protocol on best practices within the framework of the cooperation agreement with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). During the event, Colombia’s delegation will be headed by General Juan Pablo Rodríguez Barragán, Commander General of that country’s Armed Forces, who will serve as Minister of Defense in Charge. This program represents the culmination of an important stage in the Building Integrity Process, which the Ministry of National Defense – along with the Colombian Armed Forces and National Police – initiated in collaboration with NATO’s Building Integrity Program, or BI, in November 2013. The goal of the process is to conduct a self-assessment of the risks and threats that the Colombian Defense Sector is exposed to when faced with instances of corruption or fraud, as well as the set of institutional tools and measures that allow them to be mitigated. The self-evaluation will establish whether the handling of fraud and corruption can be improved, taking into account the positive experiences of NATO member nations, who have been developing a methodology for the evaluation and handling of corruption risks since 2006. NATO’s BI Program is Structured in Three Parts: a) A self-assessment or self-exam, in which the interested country responds to questions about its institutional environment. b) NATO experts visit as peers who have previously examined the self-assessment summary. c) An action plan is customized for each country, adapted to its needs, resources, legal regime, and culture. Finally, NATO offers a chance for the National Defense Ministry and the Colombian Armed Forces to define an agenda of mutual collaboration to promote success in the Building Integrity and mitigation of corruption process. This collaboration can take the form of consulting on specific topics; training or educating officials; participating in discussion forums; and accessing lessons learned and successful experiences. Thus, NATO’s institutional transparency delegates meet with Armed Forces and National Police Commanders, as well as those who are in charge of institutional anti-corruption policies. The NATO delegation visiting the Ministry of Defense includes Benedicts Borel and Alberto Bin, Director of Integration, Partnership, and Cooperation in Political and Security Affairs at NATO Headquarters in Brussels. Bin is also responsible for the development and implementation of NATO programs supporting cooperation and dialogue with non-member countries.last_img read more

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How the Binghamton Zoo is staying alive while it waits for reopening

first_imgBINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Binghamton Zoo at Ross Park says the pandemic hasn’t been easy on zoos across the nation, especially now that they have to wait for phase four to reopen. The zoo says it will first open to members and then open up more to the public when phase four of reopening allows foot traffic back into the park. “I’m not so much worried about this summer,” said Ginter. “I’m more worried for the coming winter when we can’t be open.” “We’ll be kind of eliminating where there would be two-way traffic,” said Ginter. “We’ll be installing decals on the pavement in high traffic areas to just make sure people don’t occupy the same space…as well as putting up signange throughout the zoo to remind people about social distancing.” Executive Director of Binghamton’s Zoo, Phil Ginter, says they’ve had a backup supply just in case, but having to stay closed during three months of their main season has been tough.center_img In order to comply with CDC guidelines and to make people feel comfortable, Ginter says they’ve changed things around the zoo. For example, they will have hand sanitizer stations as well as sensors put in the bathrooms so people don’t have to touch sink or toilet handles. The zoo has been raising money on social media to keep its emergency fund going in order to help feed the animals and provide them medical assistance. If you would like to donate to help the zoo, click here.last_img read more

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Family snaps up dream Queenslander in Camp Hill

first_imgInside 70 City View Road, Camp HillMr Lord said buyers were finding that stock levels are tight, and good quality homes on the market were becoming increasingly hard to come by. The home at 70 City View Road, Camp HillMore from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020Mr Lord said the new owners were a local family, who had been renting nearby in Balmoral while hunting for their dream home. The two-level property has classic Queenslander features, five bedrooms, three bathrooms, a two-car garage and in-ground pool. Inside 70 City View Road, Camp HillAccording to the latest data from CoreLogic, the median house price for a home in Camp Hill is $900,000, while Bulimba has a median of $1,270,000 and Hawthorne has a median of $1,150,000. Inside 70 City View Road, Camp Hill“A lot of buyers who were unable to secure a property at the end of last year are looking again, but are finding there are even less quality homes on the market,” he said.“Camp Hill has become such a desirable suburb as it’s more affordable and provides better opportunity for buyers than some of the surrounding suburbs like Bulimba and Hawthorne.” 70 City View Road, Camp HillThis 1930s Queenslander home has sold for $1,365,000.Marketing agent Darcy Lord of Place Real Estate, Bulimba, said the home at 70 City View Rd, Camp Hill, attracted a lot of buyers due to its quality and location.last_img read more

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The patients asking for medicinal cannabis

first_imgStuff co.nz 24 October 2015Medicinal cannabis hit the headlines when dying union boss Helen Kelly revealed she was taking illegal cannabis to relieve pain. Thousands of other Kiwis say they need cannabis too. Jack Fletcher reports.Huhana Hickey has multiple sclerosis and has been in a wheelchair since 1996. She is in pain every day.“I’m on tramadol, morphine, Paramax and codeine.”The medicines she takes for her condition make her tired, so now she has weaned herself off most of them.“I’ve had to come off it, but I got all the withdrawals.”Hickey, 53, a researcher in Maori health at AUT University, is still taking three tramadol, a strong painkiller, every day, and says ‘the pain is huge’.“The tramadol gets me through that bad time and then I get on with it.”“I’ve got a headache today, I know I’m going to be exhausted tonight, and I know that I’m going to need to take some morphine just to have a break from the pain tonight.”“I don’t like it, I don’t want to, but I have to, because there isn’t the alternative.”The alternative, Hickey says, is cannabis.Her doctors have told her medicinal cannabis could help.“They are all in favour of it, my neurologist, my pain specialist, they all want it to be legal,” Hickey says.There are thousands of New Zealanders in Hickey’s situation. Perhaps the most prominent is former CTU president Helen Kelly, terminally ill with lung cancer.This month she revealed she takes cannabis oil to relieve the pain. She had exhausted all legal pain relief.“It just seems absolutely insane that I’ve got no idea what I’m taking, how much I should take or how it’s manufactured,” she said.Other countries allow patients access to medicinal marijuana, Kelly said. “We should stop being a fishing village.”There is now a powerful lobby seeking more widespread public access to medicinal cannabis. It includes Children’s Commissioner Russell Wills, a paediatrician, who saw a dramatic change in one patient with intractable epilepsy after she got access through her mother to cannabidiol (CBD) oil.“The child had a 50 per cent reduction in seizures as well as a substantial improvement in quality of life,” Wills told The Dominion Post.Patients report that cannabis and medicinal cannabis not only relieve pain and stop seizures, they can transform their quality of life.But Wills –  and the Government – are cautious. The science of medicinal  marijuana “is still in its infancy,” says Wills.Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne says the issue is about giving people “access to a high quality, pharmaceutical product that is safe, reliable and that will alleviate their ailments.”There are moves now to begin observational trials of patients using medicinal cannabis in New Zealand  by the end of next year.At present the only cannabis-derived drug available in New Zealand is Sativex, and access to it is heavily restricted. To get a prescription for their patient, a doctor and a specialist must apply to the Ministry of Health, with Dunne making the final call.Hickey has been approved to receive the drug, an oral spray, but it is enormously expensive.“When the script arrived I took it to the pharmacy and they wanted $1400,” she says, “and I just didn’t have that money.”Medicinal cannabis comes as pills, sprays or skin patches. They are designed not to give the “high” people get from illegal marijuana.Of the 500 or more active ingredients in cannabis, most cannabis-derived drugs use cannabidiol, or CBD, a non-psychoactive ingredient (it gives no high.)Many cannabis-derived drugs also contain THC (tetrahydrocannabidiol), the psychoactive substance which creates the high.The ratios of CBD and THC are strictly regulated. Patients using the drugs won’t get stoned.Paige Gallien, 12, was the first child to be prescribed Sativex, and her father Brent says it meant he was finally able to see his real daughter.“It was as if she was always in there, but she was trapped by all the seizures.“It let her clear her mind and start learning and showing what was in there.”Paige suffers from a rare and severe form of epilepsy called Dravet Syndrome, which means she can have as many as 15 seizures a night, as well as almost constant involuntary muscle twitches, or myoclonic jerks.Brent had heard about Charlotte Figi, a girl in the United States who has the same syndrome as Paige, whose family saw an “incredible” change in Charlotte’s quality of life once they started treating her with cannabis oil.Brent put together an information packet to be given to the Ministry of Health, along with an application for Sativex signed by the family’s GP and Paige’s specialist.Within two weeks, the application was approved and Paige became the first child in New Zealand to be approved for Sativex.“We gave her the spray, and within two days of giving it to her, she dropped to having one or two seizures a day.“It was like black and white.”Paige started going days without seizures, 10 days at one stage, something her parents hadn’t seen for over six years.“Our specialist here in Hamilton is overjoyed, just absolutely rapt.”Brent explains that without generous support from a local group who fundraise for good causes, they wouldn’t have been able to afford the medication.The campaign for access to medicinal cannabis started decades ago, but collided with certain political realities. The debate over recreational use of the drug is stalemated, with passionate argument on both sides.Moves to legalise marijuana in New Zealand have all failed. However, medical use of cannabis is legal in a number of countries, including Austria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain.The Australian state of Victoria is legalising the use of medicinal cannabis in exceptional circumstances such as cases of chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, or epilepsy. New South Wales has trials in the works, as well as a new scheme to allow terminally ill people to escape prosecution if they smoke cannabis.And 23 US states now have laws of one kind or another to allow “medical marijuana”. California was the first in 1996, and some 250,000 people in the state now have a dispensation to smoke cannabis. That system has been much-criticised; the state has passed new laws to control the cultivation, transport and sale of the medicinal drug.A leading activist in the field in New Zealand is Toni-Marie Matich, CEO of United in Compassion NZ (UICNZ), a group wanting better access to medicinal cannabis and more research.The group has a database of over 6500 New Zealanders wanting access to medicinal cannabis, many of whom end up using illegal means to get the drug.“We want people to have safe access, we don’t want people going out into the black market and purchasing cannabis,” Matich says.“We want them to be able to go to their doctor and have a discussion.”Matich is hoping that, through negotiation with the Ministry of Health, UICNZ is able to start trials of medicinal cannabis products in New Zealand.She says her group has lodged an application with the Ministry of Health  to begin ‘compassionate observational trials’ by the end of 2016.“The two biggest groups in the trials would be chronic pain and intractable epilepsy [sufferers], and we would look at importing products from the US,” Matich says.“Cultivating, manufacturing and extracting products to a pharmaceutical standard is a pretty huge undertaking and an expensive one.”She says she has sat down with Dunne many times to discuss creating a viable medicinal cannabis system in New Zealand.“He listened to what I had to say and considered where I was coming from,” she reports. “We have a mutual respect.’“New Zealand needs to get on board and start doing some research.”Dunne says he would be very happy for trials of medicinal cannabis to take place in New Zealand.If planned trials in Australia of Epidiolex got positive results, he says, that could open the way for the use of the drug in New Zealand.There have been promising early results from American tests using the marijuana-based drug with young people with severe epilepsy.In 1964 an Israeli organic chemist Raphael Mechoulam first identified and isolated the main active ingredient of cannabis, the now well-known tetrahydrocannabidiol, or THC.In 1986 Mechoulam said that “extracts of the cannabis sativa can cause a variety of medicinal effects unrelated to its psychoactive properties”.These effects, he said, had been recognised since the third millennium BC, when “Chinese texts described its usefulness in the relief of pain and cramps”.Mechoulam’s research led to the discovery and isolation of  THC, the main active ingredient in cannabis.If New Zealand is able to get a better handle on the science and therapeutic effects of CBD and THC, Matich said, the stigma that lingers around medicinal cannabis can be broken.“It is all about education, and it can’t just come from the grass roots level, it needs to come from government.”Matich wants more education about the issue.“There is currently no education at a medical level, so doctors cannot support patients simply because they do not understand.the possible medicinal benefits.”Matich hopes a national symposium of international experts organised by UICNZ in Wellington next year will help.“I hope that it would bring about more understanding and prompt a discussion.”Matich wants more education about the issue.For one family, the inability to get access to the best medicine for their daughter led them to Colorado, which has become a refuge for families in search of medicinal alternatives.Jessika and Brendan Guest moved to New Zealand with their young family in 2013. Their seven year old daughter Jade has had epilepsy since birth, and has been on heavy doses of medication since she was three months old.Guest said they tried many different medications over her daughter’s life, most of them failing with some even causing more seizures.“I felt as if Jade was a guinea pig for the neurology team.“If I was to tell them that her seizures increased, the medications would increase.”Guest said the medication did not always alleviate all of her seizures, and often made her drowsy and irritable.“I couldn’t see my daughter in her little body.”“I just wanted to pick up Jade and run away, let her live her life without medications for once and enjoy some quality of life.”It was then that Guest learned of medicinal marijuana for epilepsy, and decided to move her family back to Colorado where treatment was available.Treating her daughter with a combination of high THC strains of marijuana in an oil form, Guest says the changes in her daughter are transformational.“Her physical and cognitive abilities have improved.“I’ve taken away the straps on her chair that were custom made for her to keep her from falling forward, because now she chooses to hold herself up and not rely on them.”Brendan has had to stay in New Zealand for work, and Guest said this has been hard for the family.“Brendan is missing out on these changes with Jade, and our son is growing up so fast.“These are moments that he can never get back.”So the Government faces an articulate lobby on behalf of a large group of people in chronic pain who have already found much-needed relief either from medicinal cannabis – or the drug you find on the street.They want to know: Why is the Government dragging the chain?Some say the Government is frightened of the political storm that greets any party that is “soft on dope.” Others blame the bureaucrats.Russell Wills disagrees. “The Minister and Medsafe are well briefed. They are up with the science, and have talked with international authorities.“This is not a case of bureaucratic delay. This is very cautious and appropriate conservatism about access to effective medicines that are safe.”That leaves some tough choices for patients whose medicines aren’t helping much and who think cannabis might.They can ask for help from Peter Dunne and his officials. Or they can hit the street.WHAT IS MEDICINAL CANNABIS?The Ministry of Health says the term “encompasses several types of products containing extracts of the cannabis plant that may be used to treat various medical conditions”.That doesn’t mean the plant itself, though – the ministry takes pains to point out that the Government does not support the use of “cannabis leaf or flower preparations for medicinal use”.Instead, ministerial approval can be considered for three types of products – pharmaceutical-grade drugs that have been ticked off by Medsafe, those that have been trialled overseas but don’t have consent here yet, and products that don’t meet pharmaceutical standards at all, and might not even be medicines.Other countries use the term differently. “Medical marijuana” in the United States, for instance, usually means the voter-backed laws that have allowed patients in many states to smoke the plant (most famously in California, where some 300,000 people now have that dispensation).Most medical research, in any case, focuses on pharmaceutical refinements of the plant. The first such drugs were produced in the 1980s without much effect, but now research is gathering pace.There are early signs that cannabis derivatives can help treat the effects of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and motor neurone disease, some forms of epilepsy, nausea and vomiting, “wasting” associated with HIV and cancer treatment, and chronic pain.The influential Mayo Clinic in the US says cannabis offers the “possibility of many promising pharmaceutical applications”, many yet to be understood.The sole cannabis-derived medicine currently approved for prescription in New Zealand is Sativex, an oral spray that can help improve the symptoms of multiple sclerosis, and may have other applications. Pharmac is currently considering funding the drug.Epidiolex, a pure liquid formulation of cannabidiol (CBD), one component of cannabis, is another promising treatment. It is undergoing clinical trials in the US after the high-profile success of such products in helping with seizure disorders in children.Another treatment sometimes called “medicinal cannabis” is Elixinol, which was given to Nelson teenager Alex Renton earlier this year after being approved by associate health minister Peter Dunne. However, University of Auckland pharmacology department head Michelle Glass points out that it was an “oil made from industrial hemp, which is not marijuana”.So “medicinal cannabis” is a blanket term covering a range of treatments. The laws around how their approval are not simple: because of cannabis’ status as a Class B1 controlled drug, they often require the minister’s personal intervention.The psychoactive properties of the drugs also vary and can be in some dispute. For example, Sativex, the spray approved in New Zealand, “may produce side-effects that are interpreted as a euphoria or cannabis-like ‘high’,” according to Medsafe.However, the drug’s manufacturer, GW Pharmaceuticals, says “there is no evidence from Sativex clinical trials that patients obtain a high similar to that sought by recreational cannabis users”.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/73299908/The-patients-asking-for-medicinal-cannabis?cid=app-iPhonelast_img read more

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INDOT announces 2018 U.S. 50 work

first_imgSeymour, In. — Indiana Department of Transportation officials have announced to projects on U.S. 50 in Dearborn, Ripley and Jennings Counties. US 50 “White Top”—SR 101 to Aurora Walsh Construction of Crown Point is Indiana’s contractor for a $16,790,126 “white-top” resurfacing project on 4.56 miles of U.S. 50 from State Road 101 to just west of Aurora.  The contract calls for topping the east-west roadway with a 4½-inch concrete overlay that consulting engineers say could have a 20-year service life.The white-top project includes a significant amount of concrete and asphalt patching, plus new driveway and road/street approaches.  Traffic will be shifted to single lanes in each direction on one side of the highway—then the other—while milling and overlay operations take place.Walsh hopes to mobilize in early February and begin actual construction activities by April 1.  The construction contract has a completion date of November 15.The U.S. 50 white-top project limits extent from 1.85 miles east of S.R. 262 to 2.44 miles west of S.R. 350.  Daily traffic count is 13,490 vehicles per day.     US 50 “Black Top”—Jennings/Ripley County Line to SR 101 Dave O’Mara Contractor Inc. has been contracted to repair and resurface U.S. 50 from the Jennings/Ripley County line east to S.R. 101.  Crews will begin forming 19 ADA-compliant curb ramps at Versailles in early April.  At the same time, the North Vernon contractor will start making full- and partial-depth pavement repairs along the 17.5 mile-long route.The state’s $4 million contract calls for resurfacing the section of U.S. 50 with a thin HMA asphalt overlay. This “black top” project includes drive and road/street approaches and installation of a center rumble strip.  Motorists will encounter single-lane restrictions with flaggers directing traffic around worksites as needed.U.S. 50’s traffic count at the construction zone is 9,800 vehicle per day.  The contract completion date is November 15.last_img read more

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Terry: Chelsea deserve respect

first_img Press Association John Terry insisted Chelsea deserve respect after he helped put them on the brink of the Barclays Premier League title. “Stamford Bridge, they can’t celebrate yet. If they want to celebrate they have to celebrate the Capital One Cup. “I hope they don’t go there to celebrate, I hope they go there to play the match with us and push the team.” Marc Albrighton scored his first goal since 2012 – and first for Leicester – when the Foxes went ahead in first-half stoppage time. Paul Konchesky also hit the post as the hosts matched Chelsea before the break but were denied a fifth straight top-flight win for the first time since 1963-64. Andy King and Robert Huth were forced off injured in the first half but boss Nigel Pearson refused to blame the early changes. He said: “I’m not a big believer in sitting here bemoaning what happens in games. I would say Chelsea played very well in the second half and their quality was apparent. “Our players gave everything they had and sometimes things go for you and sometimes they don’t. “What’s given us a chance to survive is the collective spirit we have. “To win four games on the spin at any level is difficult and for the players to have to deal with the amount of criticism over the course of the season is something which has has tested us all.” Arsenal fans labelled Chelsea ‘boring’ during their goalless draw on Sunday but Terry believes the Blues and boss Jose Mourinho warrant more plaudits. “I think we have to give respect to the players, and manager as well,” the defender told Sky Sports. “What he’s done with this side in two years has been different class. He deserves a lot of respect. “We were the best side by far before Christmas and I think the best side all season. We haven’t had the best results recently because teams get behind the ball and make it difficult for us. “But the players and manager deserve a lot of respect because we’ve been very good all year.” Chelsea can clinch their first title since 2010 at home against Palace but Mourinho warned against premature celebrations. “I cannot touch it, we need to win. We need two or three more points so I would say we need three points to be completely safe,” he said. “I think we all had it in our mind to try to do it at Stamford Bridge. Today, the great motivation was exactly that. They will win the league with victory over Crystal Palace on Sunday following their 3-1 triumph at Leicester. Didier Drogba, Terry and Ramires scored second-half goals to move the leaders 13 points clear in the table. last_img read more

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