Aibel secures portfolio agreement for Oseberg fields from Equinor

first_imgThe agreement includes study work and minor front-end engineering and design contract (FEED), and major modification project executions for the fields Oseberg field centre in the North Sea. (Credit: Ole Jørgen Bratland / Equinor ASA.) Norwegian oil and gas services company Aibel has secured a portfolio agreement from an energy company Equinor for the Oseberg field in the North Sea.The agreement, which has a duration of five years from 2020-2026, includes study work and minor front-end engineering and design contract (FEED).It also includes engineering, procurement, construction and installation (EPCI) projects for the fields.As the first call-off of the portfolio agreement, Aibel will be responsible for the FEED services for the Oseberg Gas Capacity Upgrade and Power from Shore project (OGP).The OGP project will include new modules for the Oseberg field centre and associated integration work both offshore and at the onshore facility at Kollsnes. FID on OGP project  is expected to be taken in 2021Equinor chief procurement officer Peggy Krantz-Underland said: “There will be an increased level of project activity at the Oseberg fields in the coming years.“With one main supplier, we will be able to synchronize the different projects schedules, utilize synergies between parallel projects and optimize personnel on board.“The portfolio agreement will allow us to work with Aibel on Oseberg in an integrated way, focusing on safety, continuous improvement and cost efficiency. It will also create predictability and continuation for supplier’s personnel and sites.”The OGP project aims to increase Oseberg asset value via timely low-pressure production and maximize gas export, while reducing the carbon footprint by partially electrifying the Oseberg field centre and Oseberg South with power from shore.Following a final investment decision in late 2021 by Equinor and its partners and a final regulatory approval for the OGP project, Equinor will have the possibility to exercise a call-off for EPCI.With support from other offices, Aibel will manage the projects from its office in Bergen.In February this year, MODEC awarded a Letter of Intent (LOI) to Aibel for the work related to supply of a new-built floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) to Equinor for the Bacalhau field in Brazil.last_img read more

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Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Data and Implementation Science

first_imgLocation: University of Maryland School of Pharmacy,Baltimore MarylandDescription: Post-doctoral fellowship in data and implementationscience available starting immediately at the University ofMaryland, Baltimore, School of Pharmacy, in the Department ofPharmaceutical Health Services Research. The fellowship providesmultidisciplinary, advanced training to researchers and clinicians,and prepares fellows for data and implementation science positionsin academia, government, and the consulting, pharmaceutical andinsurance industries.Fellows will engage in implementation science research, analyses oflarge claims and electronic health record data sets, includingsocial determinants of health, for epidemiologic andpharmacoeconomic studies and comparative effectiveness research,with activities funded by the FDA, MDH, BHA, SAMHSA, AHRQ, PCORI,NIH, foundations, and private corporations.Training includes mentored research, grant-writing, publication,presentation, and teaching experiences; it may also includecoursework. This position involves working closely with on-campusand external partners.Fellows receive benefits and a competitive salary.Qualifications :Doctoral level degree in Computer Science, Bioinformatics,Biomedical Informatics, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Economics,Operations Research, Health Services Research or related analyticalfield is required. Excellent communication, organizational, andtime-management skills are a must. Research grant writingexperience is highly desired.Additional requirements include:Expertise in machine learning, deep learning, natural languageprocessing and other AI methods in health and life sciencesdatasets.Proficiency in causal inference modeling and other advancedstatistical approaches in econometrics, outcomes, or healthservices research.Expertise in advanced computational methods such as networkanalysis, graph databases and structured and unstructured datamining tools.Knowledge of SAS, R, Python, and SQL, or data visualizationsoftware requiredKnowledge of open/public/private databases including but notlimited to clinical trials and drug databases.The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity employer.How to Apply: Applicants should submit by email*, a letter ofinterest, a CV, and two letters of recommendation. Review ofapplications will start immediately. Finalist interviews will takeplace following telephone screening interviews.F.T. Shaya, PhD, MPHProfessor and Data Science Fellowship Director*Email: [email protected]last_img read more

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Billboard campaign targets Brooks, Hollingsworth for tax vote

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare By Quinn FitzgeraldTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS–An advocacy group called Not One Penny has unveiled billboards in 30 congressional districts criticizing Republican lawmakers, including U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks, R-Carmel, and U.S. Rep. Trey Hollingsworth, R-Jeffersonville, for their support of tax cut legislation passed late last year.“There are a lot of different moving pieces about the bill that we find really bad,” said Tim Hogan, spokesperson for Not One Penny.For one, members of Congress who promoted and voted for President Donald Trump’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act stand to benefit substantially from the pass-through tax break, according to a new analysis by the Center for American Progress Action Fund––an independent, nonpartisan policy institute and advocacy organization.Additionally, the Tax Policy Center found that 92 million middle-income families across America will pay more in taxes, while the richest 0.1 percent will get a nearly $150,000 tax break from the law.Hogan said that because the plan repeals a mandate in the Affordable Care Act, 13 million Americans will lose access to affordable health care. They will also see a 10 percent increase in health insurance premiums.Not One Penny is a national coalition of 62 organizations––such as MoveOn.org and Citizens for Tax Justice––that fought against the Trump’s tax law as it was working its way through the legislative process last year. Now, they are campaigning against some Republicans who voted for the legislation.The coalition’s billboard campaign aims to show how each member is benefitting from the new tax law at the expense of American families. The billboard targeting Brooks states that she “gave herself up to a $106,500 tax break.” Hollingsworth has been called out for receiving a $4,556,500 tax break. The numbers are based on a recently-released study by CAPAF.“They’re lining their pockets while raising taxes on the middle class,” Hogan said. “They should be called out for putting themselves ahead of their constituents.”Hogan said he hopes the billboards educate the public about the negative impact of the legislation.Brooks and Hollingsworth were unavailable to comment.Quinn Fitzgerald is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.last_img read more

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Ocean City’s South End Beaches to Get a Do-Over

first_imgA relentless northeast wind had begun to blow in late September in the final days of a long-awaited Army Corps of Engineers beach replenishment project between 37th Street and 59th Street.The gale intensified over the first week of October and by the time it passed, much of the 1.5 million cubic yards of sand pumped onto the eroded south end beaches had disappeared.But Ocean City learned Monday that the Army Corps will restore what was lost. Ocean City will receive an additional 323,000 cubic yards in a project expected to start by late winter.A second piece of good news: The sand will come from Corson’s Inlet, which is largely unnavigable due to shoaling.A Monday news release from the Army Corps of Engineers is as follows:The U.S. Army Corps Engineers’ Philadelphia District announced today that it has renegotiated its contract with the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company to permit restoration of beaches in Sea Isle City, Strathmere, and southern Ocean City.Great Lakes had just finished a major beachfill in these communities this fall when a major storm hit and severely eroded the beaches. The Army Corps and its partner in the beachfill project, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, set about finding a way to repair the damage under the existing contract with Great Lakes.Under the terms of the deal announced today, Great Lakes will pump approximately one million cubic yards of additional sand on to the beaches, beginning in January. The additional cost, $15.8 million, will be borne entirely by the federal government, as was the original beachfill.The sequence of work is expected to be Strathmere (a section of Upper Township) , Sea Isle City and then Ocean City. Strathmere will receive an estimated 335,000 cubic yards, Sea Isle City 365,000, and Ocean City 323,000. The sand will come from the Corson’s Inlet borrow area.The work is expected to be completed by April 2016.The original project, known as the Great Egg to Townsend’s Inlet Beachfill, had long been authorized but was not funded until Congress approved a special relief act in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. The act provided for 100 percent federal funding of previously authorized but unconstructed beach projects.Renourishment projects on a three-year cycle at the south end will be funded 50 percent by the federal government, 50 percent by the State of New Jersey, which in turn requires the municipalities to shoulder 25 percent of the state’s cost, or 12.5 percent of the total.The local cost share for the south end is slightly higher than the cost share for north end projects negotiated in the early 1990s. That split is 65 percent federal government and 35 percent state (with Ocean City footing 25 percent of the state’s tab, or 8.75 percent of the total project cost). In October 2015, storm surf from a northeast gale encroaches on a new split-rail fence at 57th Street in Ocean City less than a week after it was installed.last_img read more

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Student event plans detailed

first_imgThe Alliance for Bakery Students and Trainees’ (ABST) Annual Conference is to be held at the Alton Towers Hotel, Alton Towers, from 11-13 June.The ABST is encouraging all students and trainees to attend, as well as participate in the bakery and confectionery competitions, which will take place on Saturday 12 June. Several new competitions are on the schedule this year, including one in partnership with food and drink sector skills council Improve, which is aimed at trainees working in the industry.Other competitions include The Horton’s Trophy, the British Confectioners Association Award, President’s Cup and the Devonshire Rose Bowl, with cash prizes available for some of them.For a copy of the schedule and a membership form, please send an email to [email protected]last_img read more

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News story: £215 million research fund to tackle the next generation of health challenges

first_img behavioural science adult social care older people and frailty cancer awareness, screening and early diagnosis Each university-based unit will host a multidisciplinary team of researchers from collaborating institutions to create a critical mass of experts for research in priority areas for health and social care policy.An extra £3 million will also be invested in the creation of a new research leader programme for nurses and midwives. Their role will help to influence new approaches to health and care and improve patient experience.Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt said: As the NHS celebrates its 70th birthday, more people than ever before are living longer lives thanks to the dedication of hardworking staff. It is therefore vital we harness technology to develop the next generation of innovative treatments as part of the government’s long-term plan for the NHS. That’s why I want our world-leading academics, researchers and technology experts to work with frontline staff to develop the innovations which not only allow people to live longer, but also to lead healthier lives, so the NHS can continue to provide world-class care to all. Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt has announced a £215 million package of funding for research that could transform the lives of millions of people who are living with a range of conditions, including life-long illnesses, mental health issues and obesity.Leading academics and technology experts will be able to apply for research funding to develop health solutions for the future that give patients greater independence and choice about how they manage their healthcare.An investment of £150 million will fund research over the next 5 years to tackle important emerging issues, including the pressures of an ageing population and the increasing demands on the NHS.The remaining £65 million will go towards 13 National Institute for Health Research policy research units that will play a vital role in making sure the government and arm’s length bodies have the best possible information and evidence available when making policy decisions about health and social care.The units will cover a range of specialisms and conditions, including:center_img Health Minister Lord O’Shaughnessy said: With a growing and ageing population, maintaining a world-class NHS depends on harnessing the discoveries of cutting-edge research and rapidly bringing them into everyday healthcare. The UK has a proud tradition of ground-breaking medical R&D and this funding means our country can continue to lead the world.last_img read more

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Detailed guide: PPE portal: how to order COVID-19 personal protective equipment (PPE)

first_img 500 IIR masks You can only log in and place an order if you’ve received an email invitation to register. 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 1 bottle of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 100 FFP masks* 100 gowns* 400 gloves (200 pairs) 1,000 aprons 2,500 IIR masks If you are eligible, you’ll receive an email invite to the PPE portal. Register with the email address the invite was sent to Receive a link to confirm registration Click on the link and create your password Order your weekly COVID-19 PPE 400 visors 400 FFP masks Community drug and alcohol services with between 501 and 1,000 clients can order up to (per week): 200 visors 600 gloves (300 pairs) 3,000 aprons 250 aprons 400 FFP masks 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Dentists should calculate their number of units of dental activity (UDAs) plus (number of units of orthodontic activity (UOAs), if any, multiplied by 1.5) per practice per year.For example, a practice that carries out 2,000 UDAs and 1,000 UOAs per year should report 2,000 plus (1,000 multiplied by 1.5) to get a composite metric of 3,500. 2,000 aprons Non-residential special schools with over 400 students can order up to (per week): Non-residential special schools with between 51 and 100 students can order up to (per week): 400 visors Dentists that annually undertake between 18,000 and 23,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): GPs with between 8,000 and 10,999 patients can order up to (per week): 200 IIR masks 3,000 aprons 1,400 gloves (700 pairs) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors Dentists that annually undertake between 12,000 and 17,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): Children’s care homes and secure homes that have more than 15 children’s places can order up to (per week): 600 visors Orthodontists that annually undertake between 12,000 and 17,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 800 IIR masks 400 FFP masks 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 5,000 IIR masks 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) Residential drug and alcohol services with between 50 and 99 beds can order up to (per week): Residential care homes: order limitsItems marked with an asterisk (*) are available to providers that carry out aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs). If you carry out AGPs but do not have access to these items on the portal, please contact 0800 876 6802.Residential care homes with fewer than 10 beds can order up to (per week): 2,000 IIR masks 300 aprons 400 IIR masks 400 FFP masks 400 IIR masks 300 aprons 600 gloves (300 pairs) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 2 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 400 visors 300 aprons 1,500 IIR masks Orthodontists that annually undertake less than 3,000 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 9,000 IIR masks 50 IIR masks 500 visors 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 18,000 IIR masks 200 visors 1,300 IIR masks 10,000 gloves (5,000 pairs) 200 gowns* 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 1 bottle of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 4,000 aprons 250 aprons Dentists that annually undertake between 6,000 and 11,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 600 visors 36 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 600 FFP masks* 600 gowns* 4,000 gloves (2,000 pairs) 400 IIR masks Residential care homes with between 10 and 24 beds can order up to (per week): 200 IIR masks Residential care homes with between 50 and 99 beds can order up to (per week): 26,000 IIR masks 100 IIR masks 100 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 400 visors 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 FFP masks* 300 gowns* 8,000 gloves (4,000 pairs) 1,400 IIR masks 400 gowns 1,000 aprons Optometrists that carry out between 5 and 9 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): Residential drug and alcohol services with 100 or more beds can order up to (per week): Community drug and alcohol services with between 101 and 500 clients can order up to (per week): 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 5 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 200 visors 2 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 gowns* Domiciliary care providers with more than 1,000 clients can order up to (per week): 200 FFP masks* Children’s care homes and secure homes: order limitsChildren’s care homes and secure homes that have fewer than 15 children’s places can order up to (per week): 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 gowns 100 gowns 36,000 gloves (18,000 pairs) 200 visors 300 IIR masks 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 2,800 gloves (1,400 pairs) 400 gowns 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 500 IIR masks 1,000 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 26,000 aprons 52,000 gloves (26,000 pairs) When to use the portalEligible health and social care providers can use the portal to meet the extra need for PPE that has arisen as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.You should not use the portal to order PPE for non-COVID-19 requirements. You should get this through your normal channels.Help with using the portalCall the customer service team on 0800 876 6802 if you have any questions about using the PPE portal, including, for example: 7,000 aprons 200 visors Residential special schools: order limitsAll residential special schools can order up to (per week): 400 visors 400 IIR masks 500 IIR masks 200 FFP masks* 3,000 visors How to order PPE using the PPE portal 600 gloves (300 pairs) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Domiciliary care providers with between 20 and 49 clients can order up to (per week): 800 IIR masks 500 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 2,000 aprons Non-residential special schools with over 400 students can order up to (per week): 400 visors 200 FFP masks* 300 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 200 FFP masks* Dentists: order limits 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 800 IIR masks 3,200 gloves (1,600 pairs) 400 gowns 200 FFP masks* 200 gowns* 200 visors Domiciliary care providers with between 150 and 500 clients can order up to (per week): 24 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 14,000 gloves (7,000 pairs) 2,000 IIR masks 3,000 aprons 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 200 gowns* 200 FFP masks 24 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 9,000 aprons 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) Optometrists that carry out between 15 and 29 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): GPs residential social care providers domiciliary social care providers pharmacies dentists orthodontists optometrists children’s care homes and secure homes all special schools and special post-16 institutes community drug and alcohol services residential drug and alcohol services 200 gowns* 200 visors Pharmacies: order limitsPharmacies with fewer than 5 staff can order up to (per week): 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Orthodontists that annually undertake between 30,000 and 35,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 200 IIR masks 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Orthodontists that annually undertake between 18,000 and 23,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 800 IIR masks 2,000 aprons 2,800 gloves (1,400 pairs) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 20,000 gloves (10,000 pairs) 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 7 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 aprons 600 FFP masks The PPE portal can be used by social care and primary care providers to get critical coronavirus (COVID-19) personal protective equipment (PPE).Providers who can use the service will receive an email invitation to register.The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has partnered with eBay, Clipper Logistics, Unipart Logistics and Royal Mail to develop this service.Who can use the portal GPs with 30,000 patients or more can order up to (per week): 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) Pharmacies with 15 or more staff can order up to (per week): 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 200 visors 36 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 600 gloves (300 pairs) 400 aprons 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 1,000 visors 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 200 visors 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 FFP masks* 200 gowns* 100 FFP masks 4,000 gloves (2,000 pairs) 300 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 200 visors 300 gowns 1,000 visors 200 visors 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Non-residential special schools with between 101 and 400 students can order up to (per week): 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 300 gowns 200 gowns* 400 visors 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 800 aprons 400 visors 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 300 gowns 200 FFP masks* 2,000 IIR masks 1,000 IIR masks 2,000 aprons 1,000 aprons 7,000 IIR masks 400 gowns 8,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Domiciliary care providers with between 500 and 999 clients can order up to (per week): Community drug and alcohol services with over 1,500 clients can order up to (per week): 200 FFP masks 1,300 aprons 5,000 gloves (2,500 pairs) 200 gowns* 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 500 aprons Residential drug and alcohol services with between 10 and 24 beds can order up to (per week): 400 visors 400 visors 600 gloves (300 pairs) Residential drug and alcohol services: order limitsResidential drug and alcohol services with fewer than 10 beds can order up to (per week): 1,600 visors 300 aprons 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 3,000 aprons Optometrists: order limitsOptometrists that carry out fewer than 5 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 400 FFP masks 300 IIR masks 8,000 gloves (4,000 pairs) 500 aprons 300 gowns 3,000 IIR masks 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 400 IIR masks 800 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 300 aprons 1 box of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) Delivery times and costPPE ordered from the portal is free of charge.Orders will be delivered by Royal Mail within 5 days.Some orders will require more than one box and may be received as multiple deliveries. 1,000 gowns 200 visors 50 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Orthodontists should calculate their number of units of orthodontic activity (UOAs) plus (number of units of dental activity (ODAs), if any, multiplied by 0.66) per practice per year.For example, a practice that undertakes 2,000 UOAs and 1,500 UDAs per year should report 2,000 plus (1,500 multiplied by 0.66) to get a composite metric of 2,990. 2,000 visors 200 FFP masks* problems with registering problems with ordering if you believe you are eligible but have not been invited 18 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 400 gloves (200 pairs) The PPE portal can be used by: 2 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 FFP masks 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 2,500 IIR masks 200 gowns* 200 FFP masks* Community drug and alcohol services with between 1,001 and 1,500 clients can order up to (per week): 200 visors The team is available from 7am to 7pm, 7 days a week to help resolve queries.We may need to contact the Care Quality Commission (CQC), NHS Business Services Authority (BSA), NHS England or the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to help resolve queries.Order limitsThe current order limits for different types and sizes of eligible health and social care providers are listed below.We’ll keep order limits under review to make sure these are based on the latest available public health guidance, COVID-19 trends, PPE requirements modelling and analysis, and provider feedback.GPs: order limitsGPs with fewer than 5,000 patients can order up to (per week): Domiciliary care providers: order limitsItems marked with an asterisk (*) are available to providers that carry out aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs). If you carry out AGPs but do not have access to these items on the portal, please contact 0800 876 6802.Domiciliary care providers with fewer than 20 clients can order up to (per week): 500 aprons 300 FFP masks 400 visors Community drug and alcohol services: order limitsCommunity drug and alcohol services with fewer than 100 clients can order up to (per week): 200 visors 10,000 IIR masks 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 aprons 1,000 IIR masks 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 gowns* 3,000 aprons 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors Dentists that undertake between 3,000 and 5,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 FFP masks Pharmacies with between 10 and 14 staff can order up to (per week): 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 IIR masks 250 aprons 400 gloves (200 pairs) 2 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 300 IIR masks 300 aprons 10,000 aprons 2,000 IIR masks Non-residential special schools with between 51 and 100 students can order up to (per week): 1,500 aprons 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) Pharmacies with between 5 and 9 staff can order up to (per week): 6,000 gloves (3,000 pairs) Dentists that annually undertake between 30,000 and 35,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 400 gowns 300 FFP masks Orthodontists that undertake between 3,000 and 5,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): If you’re a provider in one of these categories, your invitation to register will be sent to your email account registered with Care Quality Commission (CQC), NHS Business Services Authority (BSA), NHS England or the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). This email will be from [email protected]ation about children’s social care providers is supplied to DHSC by the Department for Education.Steps to getting free PPE Residential care homes with between 25 and 49 beds can order up to (per week): 8,000 gloves (4,000 pairs) Domiciliary care providers with between 100 and 149 clients can order up to (per week): 2 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 24 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Optometrists that carry out 30 or more sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 400 FFP masks 600 gowns 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 800 gloves (400 pairs) Orthodontists: order limits Residential drug and alcohol services with between 25 and 49 beds can order up to (per week): 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 IIR masks 500 aprons 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 visors 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors Domiciliary care providers with between 50 and 99 clients can order up to (per week): 500 IIR masks 200 gowns* 1,400 aprons 4,000 visors Orthodontists that annually undertake between 6,000 and 11,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 3 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) Optometrists that carry out between 10 and 14 sight tests daily can order up to (per week): 250 aprons 400 FFP masks PPE is delivered directly to the address supplied to us 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 5 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 gloves (200 pairs) Orthodontists that annually undertake between 24,000 and 29,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 700 IIR masks 4,000 aprons 250 aprons 200 visors 400 IIR masks 200 FFP masks* PPE standardsAll PPE offered on the portal meets UK government quality standards.You can find more information on PPE standards at Public Health England’s COVID-19 PPE hub and NHS guidance on supply and use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and other supplies.When to use local resilience forumsYou can now get all the COVID-19 PPE you need from the PPE portal.However, PPE from local resilience forums (LRFs) can be made available on the basis of clinical need, for example a demonstrable spike in local COVID-19 cases or temporary difficulties in accessing other distribution channels.All other adult social care services not supplied by the PPE portal will be able to access PPE through their LRFs or local authorities, depending on local arrangements.Other providers who are not invited to use the portal should continue using their LRFs if they cannot get the PPE they need through wholesaler routes.For business-as-usual and non-clinical grade PPE needs all providers should continue accessing their normal supply routes.Contact usCall the customer service team on 0800 876 6802 if you have any questions about using the PPE portal.The team is available from 7am to 7pm, 7 days a week, to help resolve your queries. 200 visors 200 gowns* GPs with between 11,000 and 29,999 patients can order up to (per week): Non-residential special schools (who conduct aerosol-generating procedures): order limitsItems marked with an asterisk (*) are available exclusively to providers that carry out aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs). If you carry out AGPs but do not have access to these items on the portal, please contact 0800 876 6802.Non-residential special schools with between 1 and 50 students can order up to (per week): 100 IIR masks 8 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 3 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 10,000 gloves (5,000 pairs) 3,000 IIR masks 200 visors 200 IIR masks 200 visors Dentists that annually undertake less than 3,000 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 4,000 IIR masks Dentists that annually undertake between 24,000 and 29,999 of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 200 FFP masks* 1,000 IIR masks Non-residential special schools (who do not conduct aerosol-generating procedures): order limitsNon-residential special schools with between 1 and 50 students can order up to (per week): 500 aprons 700 aprons 700 IIR masks 200 IIR masks 200 FFP masks* 500 IIR masks 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 600 aprons 100 IIR masks 100 aprons 200 gloves (100 pairs) 200 visors 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 200 FFP masks 48 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 4 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) 18,000 aprons Dentists that undertake 36,000 or more of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 5 boxes of small hand hygiene (usually 100ml) Residential care homes with 100 or more beds can order up to (per week): 500 aprons GPs with between 5,000 and 7,999 patients can order up to (per week): 4,000 IIR masks 200 visors 12 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 300 gowns 300 gowns 18,000 gloves (9,000 pairs) 400 gowns Orthodontists that undertake 36,000 or more of the composite metric can order up to (per week): 4,000 IIR masks 1,400 gloves (700 pairs) 400 visors 200 visors 1,600 IIR masks 1,000 aprons 2,000 gloves (1,000 pairs) 10 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 400 visors 200 FFP masks* 250 aprons 400 gowns 200 gowns* 4 bottles of hand hygiene (usually 500ml) 1,500 aprons 200 FFP masks 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) 700 IIR masks 1,000 gloves (500 pairs) Non-residential special schools with between 101 and 400 students can order up to (per week): 4,400 gloves (2,200 pairs)last_img read more

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Joint U.S.-Russian study charts steps toward safe, secure nuclear energy growth

first_imgA new report – the product of an unusual collaboration between leading U.S. and Russian institutes – recommends a broad range of cooperative steps by Russia and the United States to strengthen nuclear safety, security, and nonproliferation around the world, and to develop new approaches to nuclear energy.The study, from the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Russian Research Center “Kurchatov Institute,” argues that nuclear energy would need to grow dramatically to play a major role in meeting the urgent energy challenges of the 21st century, and that strengthened safety, security, and nonproliferation measures are key enablers of such large-scale growth.The recommendations include:A new presidential-level nuclear security initiative designed to put in place and sustain high levels of nuclear security in Russia, the United States, and around the world, fulfilling the promise of the nuclear security summit;New steps to find and fix the world’s least safe nuclear reactors, to strengthen nuclear safety culture around the world, and to help states building nuclear reactors for the first time to achieve high levels of safety;New measures to help stem the spread of nuclear weapons, from multilateral fuel cycle facilities to strengthened efforts to stop black-market nuclear networks; andA multilateral consortium to market factory-built nuclear reactors with high levels of built-in safety, security, and proliferation resistance, and to provide “cradle to grave” services for these facilities.  This approach could make it possible to deploy nuclear energy widely around the world without adding substantially to risks of accidents, terrorism, or nuclear proliferation.The authors recommend that the recently negotiated Russian-U.S. nuclear cooperation agreement be brought into force as soon as possible, to facilitate the broad range of U.S.-Russian nuclear cooperation the report envisions.  This cooperation, they argue, will serve both U.S. and Russian national interests, as well as those of the world community.The project was directed by Matthew Bunn of the Belfer Center and Vyacheslav P. Kuznetsov of the Kurchatov Institute.  Contributing authors include Andrei Yu. Gagarinski, Nikolai N. Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Vladimir M. Schmelev, Stanislav A. Subbotin, Victor E. Tsibulski, and Evgeniy P. Velikhov from the Kurchatov Institute, and  Graham T. Allison, Martin B. Malin, Steven E. Miller, Andrew Newman, and William H. Tobey from BCSIA.  On the U.S. side, the project was managed as part of the Belfer Center’s Project on Managing the Atom. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s welcomes Naval Academy midshipmen with traditional dance

first_imgBefore shipping off, Midshipmen had the opportunity to wave hello to Saint Mary’s students at the College’s traditional naval ball — which took place in Rice Commons on Saturday. Photo courtesy of Lilly Chamberlin Saint Mary’s students socialize with midshipmen at the College’s Navy Ball, which takes place after each home football game between Notre Dame and Navy.First year student Lilly Chamberlin said she attended the ball to learn more about the Naval Academy.“I have a friend at the Air Force Academy, so I thought it would be fun to hear about experiences from another Academy,” Chamberlin said.Sophomore Moira LeMay said she grew up near Annapolis, Maryland, and knew several of the Naval Academy students at the ball. For that reason, she said the ball felt like a small piece of home.“I liked being able to meet people just for fun, and that’s the beauty of the dance,” LeMay said.Chamberlin said her favorite part of the ball was dancing, and she enjoyed socializing with Naval Academy students.After the dance, she said she showed some Midshipmen around Notre Dame’s campus, and they waited with her at the bus stop so she could return to Saint Mary’s.“They stayed until the bus got there even though they didn’t really know how to get back to the dorm they were staying at,” she said. “I thought that was very polite and showed the good character most of them have.”The dance was a great way to relieve stress and meet new people, Chamberlin said. Chamberlin said she noticed the ball benefitted not only Saint Mary’s students, but also Naval Academy students.“[The Navy students] told us it was one of the only times since being at the Academy that they have felt normal, and they thanked us for actually being normal and not only talking military,” she said. “It is a fun thing for them to have a weekend off from reality, and it is nice to meet people who are from a different school and have very different college experiences.”LeMay said the dance was interesting because not many people knew each other prior to the event.“It felt like an eighth grade dance, but then it was a better once everyone got over the tension,” she said.Chamberlin said she thinks the Navy Ball offers entertainment to both parties, so it’s a tradition the school should keep.“It’s a tradition, so why break it?” she said.Tags: Midshipmen, Naval Academy, Naval midshipmen, Navy, navy balllast_img read more

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