Seniors end careers as part-time students

first_imgSome members of Notre Dame’s Class of 2011 will end their four-year college careers by completing their final semester at Notre Dame as part-time students. Assistant registrar Lora Spaulding said many seniors choose to become part-time students in order to save money on tuition. “If it’s a student’s last semester and they need less than 12 credit hours to graduate, they can discuss the possibility of becoming part-time with their academic dean,” Spaulding said. “We currently have 192 seniors enrolled as part-time, which in the grand scheme of things really isn’t that many.” Spaulding said tuition for part-time students is based on the number of credit hours they are taking during the semester. This semester, part-time students will pay $1,642 per credit hour, she said. According to Spaulding, seniors who enroll part-time are unable to live on campus, but still have student IDs and continue to have the same opportunities that full-time students have. “Part-time students can still go to Rolfs and can still have a meal plan, if they choose to do so,” she said. Senior Allie Colaco, a biology major, said she is taking just one class as a part-time student this semester. “I had the credits, so I figured I might as well save the money,” she said. As a part-time student, Colaco said she will fill up some of her free time by working in a lab and serving as a teaching assistant (TA) in undergraduate science classes. Senior Kevin Ritt said he didn’t initially plan on becoming a part-time student this semester. “The idea of being part-time hadn’t really occurred to me, but my parents asked if I would mind doing it to save them some money,” Ritt said. “I have two brothers, one who just graduated, and one who is a sophomore in college, so the option of saving some cash was very appealing to them, and, frankly, the idea of only having one class didn’t bother me too much either.” Ritt said he is especially looking forward to having more free time. “I’m going to spend my time looking for a job after graduation, working out, and trying to hang out with my friends as much as possible before we all scatter after graduation,” he said. “I also expect to be outrageously good at video games by the end of this semester.”last_img read more

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Fr. Jenkins surprises Philbin

first_imgAs 1953 alumnus Regis Philbin prepares to retire from his popular morning show, two Notre Dame faces surprised him on “Live with Regis and Kelly” Thursday morning. University President Fr. John Jenkins and former Irish coach Lou Holtz appeared on the talk show to congratulate Philbin on his long career in television. Holtz praised Philbin for the entertainment and joy he has brought his viewers over the years with co-host Kelly Ripa. “You two have just made a great team, and you’ve had a positive impact on so many people’s lives,” Holtz said. “I can’t thank you enough for all you both have done for this country, for the people, the fun, the joy. A lot of people can be successful, but you’ve helped a lot of other people be successful. I’m here not as Lou Holtz. I’m here on behalf of the millions of people that say thank you for the sacrifice you’ve made.” Holtz said he is grateful for the relationship he built with Philbin throughout his career. “When the bank asks me to list my assets, I start with my friendship with Regis Philbin,” Holtz said. Later in the show, Jenkins presented the host with a statue depicting the Visitation before Jesus’ birth sculpted by Holy Cross priest Fr. Tony Lauck. “We are so proud to call Regis an alum, and we are so proud of everything you have accomplished,” Jenkins said. “I had to come out on behalf of the whole Notre Dame family to tell you how much we love you and how proud we are of you … We expect to see more of you now.” Jenkins recognized Philbin’s contributions to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and other non-profit organizations. “These people know what a great entertainer you are and how much happiness you bring to people’s lives, but you also have done so much privately and in a low key way to help others,” Jenkins said. “[This statue is] an image of the love and hope you have shared with so many people in your life.”last_img read more

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Band gives back to community

first_imgThough there is no service requirement for members of the Notre Dame Band, around 20 to 40 students make time to engage in service in the South Bend community each week. Senior Michael Schwind, band president, volunteers with the Salvation Army of St. Joseph County’s “BandLink” program, which offers music and band instruction to local parochial schools that may not have the means to offer such programs. Schwind said the young boy he tutors in the program enjoys learning to play instrument. “[My student] gets so excited to be able to learn and to take his trumpet home and practice,” he said. “I am able to guide him and help him get better while still having fun.” Schwind said working with the children is beneficial for him as well.    “It is rewarding to take time out of my day to help and see how the kids progress,” he said. Junior Samantha Matthew, band service commissioner, said she sees an impact on the children in the “BandLink” program.   “These programs give the kids something to look forward to and something to continue for a very long time,” Matthew said. “Getting involved in music can shape one’s college life or future even. I am glad that I can be a part of shaping that foundation.” In addition, band members tutor children in four South Bend elementary schools twice a week and host a holiday concert with their students, Schwind said. Some band members also participate in game watches with the sisters of Saint Mary’s convent for at least one away game during the season. Throughout the game, the members play concerts for the sisters, Matthew said. During the holiday season, some members of the band will add volunteer activity to their schedules. Matthew also said the band will serve food at the South Bend Center for the Homeless during the Thanksgiving season, and the band will participate in the “Adopt a Family” program at the Salvation Army during Christmas. The program entails buying Christmas gifts for children and families who can’t afford them. This year, the band will “adopt” 17 children, Matthew said. “We get a note-card with the child’s name, size and age,” she said. “We buy Christmas gifts with the money that the band usually raises. My [band] section usually tries to provide a winter coat or shoes which would make a world of difference for a little kid.” Assistant Band Director Matt Merten originally started the band’s service programs, but the programs are student-run and completely voluntary, Schwind said.last_img read more

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Energy week promotes sustainable practices

first_img “We did the bulk of this work last semester, but we basically just communicated and brainstormed with Jonathan Geels [project specialist for the South Bend Department of Energy] about ways we could encourage a student-community relationship with the shared interest of sustainable energy,” she said. “Every year, we have about 30 students go on the tour,” he said. “It is actually a fascinating tour, because you learn not only about the power but the water and how it is all really interconnected.” Eckert said the collaboration is a way for students to break out of the “Golden Dome bubble.” Junior Lauren Eckert said the partnership aims to bond students with South Bend residents through a shared interest. On Saturday, Eckert said there will be both a trolley tour and bike tour of green and sustainable buildings in the community. The South Bend community is also hosting their very own energy week this week, Eckert said. Wednesday, students have the opportunity to tour the Notre Dame Power Plant. “This event is not affiliated with Energy Week here, but in conjunction with,” she said. “The community has taken it to a while other level. What started as a Notre Dame event has grown for the entire community.” “I was very excited to find out South Bend has some very progressive LEED-[Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design] certified buildings, which will be on the community energy tours,” she said. Hosted by the Center for Sustainable Energy student advisory board (CSEND), Energy Week teaches students about energy consumption and sustainability. “As students, we can have a tendency to dismiss South Bend and it was really exciting to find a part of the community that was progressive and very interested in sustainable energy,” she said. “We have a lot of interesting companies coming … GE, Innovative Solar and then DayAway Careers,” he said. Brach said the dinner, which is taking place this evening in Club Naimoli, is a great networking event. Students can attend another networking event Tuesday night at Legends of Notre Dame, where Maggie Koerth-Baker, author of “Before the Lights Go Out,” will give a presentation, Brach said. This week, students should remember to turn the lights off in their dorm rooms and take the stairs instead of the elevator: Energy Week is upon us. For the first time, Notre Dame is collaborating with the city of South Bend on Energy Week. CSEND student board chairman Daniel Brach said he became involved with the group after he visited the display on South Quad of energy businesses, organizations and Notre Dame researchers during last year’s event. “I went to the Quad Display and was talking with GE [General Electric] and I was really fascinated, [and] I was just getting into the energy issue and they said I should come to the career dinner,” he said. “I went on a whim and all these companies come and talk about what their company is doing, where they see the future of energy is.” For a full list of Energy Week events, go to energy.nd.edulast_img read more

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Students evaluate voter ID laws

first_imgWhen voters across the nation visit the polls Nov. 6, residents of some states may be required to bring along a document they did not need in previous elections – a form of identification. The popularity of so-called “voter ID laws,” the first of which was enacted in Alabama in 2003, has increased greatly over the past several years. Presently, 30 states have passed some form of law requiring voters to present a valid form of identification prior to voting in an election. Senior Mickey Gardella, president of Notre Dame’s College Republicans, said voter ID laws are reasonable and present a very small infringement on liberty, if any at all. “It’s very important in preventing voter fraud and making sure people are who they say they are,” he said. “In today’s day and age it’s very easy and almost necessary to have some form of ID.” The form of identification required by states varies. Some state legislatures have passed strict laws requiring a government-issued photo ID, while others will accept anything with an individual’s name on it, such as a food stamp card or a utility bill. Although Gardella’s home state of New Jersey does not have a voter ID law in place, he said he understands the laws are intended to protect the rights of voting citizens. “We look at it as protecting the rights of citizens, that their votes count and there votes are not diluted by people who should not be voting because they are not citizens, not registered or they’re impersonating someone else,” he said. Senior Jessie Bretl’s home state of Wisconsin recently passed a strict ID law requiring voters to present photo identification prior to casting their ballots. The law will go into effect after the 2012 elections. Bretl said she was surprised she did not need to present identification when she voted in a recall in June and said she will be glad when the new law takes effect. “All I needed was my name to be able to vote,” she said. “Any person could have said my name and voted for me. The new law will make me more comfortable that the process is fair and that chances of election fraud would seriously decrease.” Although the laws have many supporters, opponents of voter ID laws claim the laws favor Republicans since citizens more likely to vote Democrat are also more likely to have difficulties obtaining identification for financial reasons.,When voters across the nation visit the polls Nov. 6, residents of some states may be required to bring along a document they did not need in previous elections – a form of identification. The popularity of so-called “voter ID laws,” the first of which was enacted in Alabama in 2003, has increased greatly over the past several years. Presently, 30 states have passed some form of law requiring voters to present a valid form of identification prior to voting in an election. Senior Mickey Gardella, president of Notre Dame’s College Republicans, said voter ID laws are reasonable and present a very small infringement on liberty, if any at all. “It’s very important in preventing voter fraud and making sure people are who they say they are,” he said. “In today’s day and age it’s very easy and almost necessary to have some form of ID.” The form of identification required by states varies. Some state legislatures have passed strict laws requiring a government-issued photo ID, while others will accept anything with an individual’s name on it, such as a food stamp card or a utility bill. Although Gardella’s home state of New Jersey does not have a voter ID law in place, he said he understands the laws are intended to protect the rights of voting citizens. “We look at it as protecting the rights of citizens, that their votes count and there votes are not diluted by people who should not be voting because they are not citizens, not registered or they’re impersonating someone else,” he said. Senior Jessie Bretl’s home state of Wisconsin recently passed a strict ID law requiring voters to present photo identification prior to casting their ballots. The law will go into effect after the 2012 elections. Bretl said she was surprised she did not need to present identification when she voted in a recall in June and said she will be glad when the new law takes effect. “All I needed was my name to be able to vote,” she said. “Any person could have said my name and voted for me. The new law will make me more comfortable that the process is fair and that chances of election fraud would seriously decrease.” Although the laws have many supporters, opponents of voter ID laws claim the laws favor Republicans since citizens more likely to vote Democrat are also more likely to have difficulties obtaining identification for financial reasons.last_img read more

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Career Center offers new course to FYS students

first_imgAfter spring break, the Career Center will offer a discernment course for first-year students who are wondering how to make the most of their time at Notre Dame. Elly Brenner, an academic advisor for First Year of Studies, said the course aims to help students learn the skills necessary for career discernment at a faith-based university. “We will ask students to take a pretty hard look at their lives,” Brenner said. “We want them to have the opportunity to evaluate what it is that makes them tick and think about whether or not they are feeding their passions.” Brenner said she and Hilary Flanagan, director of the Career Center, will teach the course on Mondays from 6 to 8 p.m. The pair will collaborate with several campus organizations like Campus Ministry, the Center for Social Concerns and the Institute for Church Life. Various campus advisors and faculty members from the Mendoza College of Business will also assist in the course. “We hope students who take the course will be better prepared to be more intentional in their personal development during their time at Notre Dame, as well as in their lifetime pursuits,” Brenner said. “[To take] time for self-assessment and make use of campus resources to focus on discerning a path for their truest and best selves.” The course aims to help students assess personal strengths and areas for growth, develop an appreciation for good mentoring and cultivate a disposition for informed exploration during the college years, Brenner said. “It’s a lofty goal, but I think we have the right team put together to make this a tremendous experience for the students who participate,” she said. Brenner said she hopes students discover campus discernment resources and recognize why they make certain choices about courses of study and future aspirations. Flanagan said the Career Center is excited by the interest the course has generated. “As we seek to create an authentic human community, it is imperative that we allow students the opportunity to discover their authentic selves and think about where their unique talents can best serve the world in a way that is also personally filling,” she said.last_img read more

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ND offers Ireland opportunities

first_imgIn 2014, more Notre Dame students than ever will travel across the ocean to spend the summer in Ireland through programs offered by Notre Dame International Studies, according to the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies and the Career Center. Peggy Weber, assistant director of off-campus programs, said the strong connection between the University and Ireland offers students the chance to experience the country through its summer study abroad program, sponsored internships or an eight-day guided trip. Weber said the various programs are particularly valuable to students who are not able to study abroad during the normal school year. “We’re just trying to think of more opportunities and different opportunities for people,” she said.In addition to the six-week academic study abroad program that will host up to 25 students, Weber said the eight-day trip to Ireland could accommodate 100 students. “[It is a] compact trip, going places you couldn’t go yourself, or meeting people you couldn’t normally, especially packed into that period of time,” Weber said. The trip itinerary includes visits to Irish landmark and a personal visit with President of Ireland Michael D. Higgins, an experience in which Notre Dame study abroad students and interns can also participate. “There is a lot of Notre Dame support, and for the short time that you’re there, whether for the internship or the eight-day trip, the days are packed with experiences so you can come back with a good idea about Ireland,” Weber said. Students who cannot fit studying abroad into their college plans can still experience Irish culture through internships sponsored by Notre Dame’s Career Center and the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, which Weber said are open to juniors from almost all academic disciplines. “Because we had the [Navy football] game there last fall, more and more companies are interested in having Notre Dame students come and intern,” Weber said. “There are also a lot of Arts and Letters internships.” Currently, only six internships sponsored by the Keough-Naughton Institute are available on the Career Center’s GoIrish website, but Weber said more will be posted in the future. “An [Irish] internship is different than the type you would have in the U.S. because there you’re working with mentors at Notre Dame and Ireland to really integrate the experience,” she said. Notre Dame’s presence in Ireland enhances the internship opportunity and makes students more comfortable living abroad, according to Weber. “The first week you’re going to be there is a welcome week when you tour around. Then, every Tuesday there’s a dinner, so there is no isolation … [and] besides the Tuesday night dinners, every weekend there are different trips,” she said. “There would be an internship coordinator who was available 24/7 to help and coordinate.   “Sometimes, [doing] an internship in a city where you didn’t know anyone could be very isolating, no social life in the evening, and this way you can avoid that.” Contact Grace McCormack at [email protected]last_img read more

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Over 700 students attend March for Life in Washington, D.C.

first_imgOn Friday, the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was alive with the chants and marching of thousands from around the country. More than 700 of them came from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross College students according to Notre Dame Right to Life, which organized the trip. The annual March for Life began in 1974 to protest the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, which legalized abortion nationwide. For over a decade, hundreds of students from the three campuses have attended. Notre Dame Right to Life president Aly Cox said the trip is heavily subsidized by the Center for Ethics and Culture and Campus Ministry, but students pay $35 to attend. Cox, a senior at Notre Dame, said the club didn’t send a group last year, but the student attendance this year was similar to that that two years ago. “It was majority freshmen and sophomores, which for us is really encouraging, because hopefully if they had a good experience they’ll keep going and will invite their friends to come,” she said. “We were really happy with the turnout this year.”The students marched for approximately two hours, starting at noon at the National Mall and going to the steps of the Supreme Court. “I think this year probably had a higher turnout,” Cox said. “People are really fired up about it. I think the fact that our current state is so political, not even about how the election went, just that people are so emotionally invested in the issues that they care about right now, that it kind of pushes people to actually get on a bus or a plane and go to D.C.”Cox also said that the planning process for the trip is extensive, often spanning six months. The club chartered 13 buses to take the group to D.C. The event didn’t run into any major complications or setbacks, Cox said.“We were really lucky — the weather is usually our biggest enemy on the March for Life. This year the weather was really clear, we didn’t get any snow,” she said.Freshman Collette Gillespie said she had always wanted to go to the March for Life.“My high school had a few trips to the March for Life, but they were kind of expensive, and not that many people went,” she said. “When I saw that this one was only $35 and a chance to go to D.C. with a group of 700 [Notre Dame] people, I was like, ‘of course I’m going to go to this. It’s a great deal and it’s for a great cause.’Gillespie said the marchers were diverse. “There were so many different people there—everyone from infants to people probably 80 years old were at the march, of all different races, all for the same cause.”After the march, the students were free to split up and explore the city with their friends.“I’m so glad I went,” Gillespie said. “I think what was really powerful was when I saw a timelapse of the march and how many people were there. When you’re in the middle of the march, you don’t realize how many people are around you, and you don’t realize how long the line is, but when we went up a hill and could look back, oh my gosh that was awesome. You couldn’t even see the end of the line.”Gillespie said that she feels that attending these sort of events is an important way to bring about change.“The best way to make change happen if you’re passionate about something is to get involved with it,” she said. “There’s a difference between saying you support something and actually going and doing something about it. If you believe in something, you should try to fight for it.”Freshman Jack Ferguson, a resident of the D.C. area, said he’s been attending the march for many years.“I’ve always watched them[Notre Dame Right to Life] with admiration, and this year it was incredible to be a part of the group I’ve watched for so long,” he said. Ferguson said the march expresses a “core belief.”“Life is sacred and precious, and in our opinion, the Roe v. Wade decision is one of the most horrible [Supreme Court] decisions, and it violates human life,” Ferguson said. “The March for Life is really the signature event of the pro-life movement.”Cox said attending the march is an important way to make meaningful change and endorse pro-life policies.“I think the reason we feel it’s so important to go is that we feel that we can help create a world in which no life, no matter its condition, would ever be considered negligible or disposable,” she said. “The world that we want for refugees, for immigrants, for people that are homeless, for persons who are disabled, for those in prison, the world we want for all of them requires that no group of people is considered negligible or disposable, and I think right now we’re seeing the group of the unborn persons being systematically decided that their lives don’t deserve constitutional protection, and we believe that’s a very dangerous precedent to set regarding all the different social issues.” Tags: March for Life, ND Right to Lifelast_img read more

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Student creates Habitat for Humanity chapter at SMC

first_imgSaint Mary’s students volunteered their time to build walls for “Women Build,” a project by Habitat for Humanity. Junior Kay Thursby started a Saint Mary’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity and she — along with other Saint Mary’s students — participated in the project as their first event.Thursby said in an email that Habitat for Humanity has always been an instrumental part of her life.“I have been involved with Habitat for Humanity since high school,” she said. “I was really involved in my high school youth group at Old St. Pat’s in Chicago, and we went on service trips every summer. After I graduated, I served as the intern for the youth group and helped plan and execute these service trips. “I have been doing that the last three summers and have coordinated with over six Habitat for Humanity affiliates. [Habitat for Humanity] is by far my favorite non-profit.”Thursby has always wanted to help the St. Joseph chapter of Habitat for Humanity, she said. But in order to do so, she had to establish a chapter of Habitat for Humanity at Saint Mary’s. “Ever since freshman year, I have always wanted to become involved with the St. Joseph Affiliate, but just never really seemed to have the time to do it,” she said. “This year, I came knowing that I was going to volunteer, but quickly discovered that there wasn’t a campus chapter here, but there was a strong desire to have it. So, I decided to take it upon myself and start it.” Habitat for Humanity is about improving the lives of those in need as well as the lives of everyone in the community, Thursby said.“Habitat for Humanity is an extremely important non-profit because of their commitment to truly bettering society,” she said. “People often think of charity work as just giving things away and this isn’t true, especially with [Habitat for Humanity]. Homeowners are required to volunteer hundreds of hours in order to receive a home, and I think that this is extremely important, not only in the efficiency of Habitat, but also in the sense of ownership the homeowners truly feel. It’s a tough and long process of obtaining a Habitat house, but, based on every testimony from homeowners I have talked to, it’s always worth it.”The Saint Mary’s students involved in the new chapter participated in their first ever event Saturday to help “Women Build,” an event that began with a group women who wanted to build and provide affordable housing for everyone. “Women Build is a Habitat for Humanity-wide event in which every affiliate picks a homeowner and the whole construction of their home has to be completed — at the very minimum — by 60 percent of women,” she said. “On Saturday, we constructed all the walls for the home. We put together over thirty-five walls with some other volunteers. It was really inspiring and rewarding actually being able to see the work we did. As our first chapter event, it was a major success.”Junior Morgan Klein was one of the volunteers who helped with Women Build. She said she had never been exposed to Habitat to Humanity before, but when Thursby started a campus chapter, she found more information and became excited about finding a new way to serve the community. “It’s a really amazing way to give back to the community,” Klein said. “A lot of students are always looking for new ways to serve and [Habitat for Humanity] is a great way to help people and spend meaningful time doing something that can make everyone’s life better.”Thursby said the volunteers are the reason Habitat for Humanity can help so many people. “Without volunteers, Habitat for Humanity would not be nearly as successful as they are,” she said. “They truly rely on volunteers, so there would be so many less people living in affordable housing without [Habitat for Humanity] and its volunteers.”Sophomore volunteer Micaela Petrarca said in an email that she is proud of the Saint Mary’s Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. “I’m proud of our president Kay Thursby for making this club and introducing Habitat to me,” Petrarca said.“It’s an amazing organization and I’m so happy to be a part of it now.”All students are welcome to join the Saint Mary’s Chapter of Habitat for Humanity, Thursby said. “Any and all students are more than welcome to become members of our campus chapter,” she said. “It’s never too late to become involved, and the more members we have, the more work we can do.” Tags: charity, habitat, habitat for humanity, volunteer, women buildlast_img read more

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Notre Dame implements new ID card program

first_imgOver the summer, Notre Dame began implementing the new Irish1Card system, a project that has been in the works for years and includes the smart chip ID cards every student received during welcome week. The change, Irish1Card program director Daniel Tormey said, focused on improving security, but also lays the foundation for new, even more secure and easy-to-use technologies.“Part of what we’re trying to do and part of what I’ve tried to do is say, ‘let’s get a system in place that allows us to explore different technologies and really positions us to be scalable,’” he said. “So if we want to do things with mobile or do things with other types of what we call ‘credentials,’ not just a card but wristbands and other things like that — you need a system in place that can support that.” Before this year, Notre Dame had been using the same Irish1Card program since the mid-90s: a long time, technologically speaking. Though the system worked well, Tormey said, Notre Dame was behind other colleges in exploring new possibilities.“Overall, we invested — I’m not exaggerating — years of time looking at not just smart cards but really looking at what other schools are doing and hearing what their stories have been,” Tormey said.The shift involved several committees and what Tormey called “RFP,” or a Request for Proposal, in which Notre Dame reached out to various vendors to ask for their recommendations before choosing the program it liked best. While implementation has gone mostly gone smoothly, the sheer scale of the overhaul presents challenges in itself, from ordering enough supplies to installing new equipment, Tormey said.“When you do a project this big, you’re working with lots of groups on campus,” Tormey said. “We’re heavily involved and supported by OIT. We have a lot of areas around campus that have a point of sales, Domer Dollar readers, those types of things, so we spent a lot of time this summer when we went live with the new system trying to make sure that we brought everyone along and everyone has what they need.” Tormey said the cards’ ease of use masks complicated connections and communications channels. Ensuring these connections work was one of the challenges of the new program, he said.“There are a lot of systems involved with making all of that happen, so there’s a lot of data that has to get from the front end down to all of those systems,” Tormey said. “Making sure that all of the integrations between those systems work and continue to work so that at the user level there’s no issue … it just takes a lot of time and a lot of people, and it’s a huge investment to make sure that everything is working the way it’s designed to work.”One such issue arose in Flaherty Hall, where the ID cards are also used as room keys to students’ individual rooms. The system failed during move-in weekend, locking some students out of their rooms and requiring calls to OIT.“There were some challenges early on with certain pieces of hardware getting updated with the information that they needed,” Tormey said. “It was a communication issue with that data getting to that specific room reader. Even though all of that was tested, when all of a sudden you have thousands of card holders’ information being pushed out from the different locations, there’s a different level of load-testing that we weren’t in a position to do at the time.” The issue was resolved by Saturday, and Flaherty resident Mary Kate O’Leary, a sophomore, said the room key cards the hall used last year had more issues.“Last year we had more problems with the prox cards than now because sometimes the whole system the prox cards were on would break down and the whole hallway would be locked out,” O’Leary said. “I’ve had less problems using the ID card.” Student groups and faculty members have already started reaching out with questions and suggestions about new card features and abilities. Their input is welcome, Tormey said, and the Irish1Card office looks forward to working with them in the future.“The feedback that we’ve gotten from all of these changes has been overwhelmingly positive,” Tormey said. “I feel like we’re really moving in a good direction, and the student groups we’ve spoken with and interacted with seem to be very encouraged that the University is focusing on technology like this that impacts people day to day.”Tags: flaherty hall, ID Cards, Irish1Card, OITlast_img read more

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