Don Layton Explains CRT Process and Effectiveness

first_img Related Articles  Print This Post About Author: Seth Welborn CRT Fannie Mae Freddie Mac loans 2020-02-03 Seth Welborn Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Previous: Single-Family Rental Experts to Assemble in Dallas Next: Fannie Mae Prices $1.134B Transaction Amidst “Market Volatility” Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market February 3, 2020 1,857 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Don Layton Explains CRT Process and Effectiveness Home / Daily Dose / Don Layton Explains CRT Process and Effectiveness Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: CRT Fannie Mae Freddie Mac loans Sign up for DS News Daily Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago In part one of a series of papers authored by former Freddie Mac CEO and Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies (JCHS) Senior Industry Fellow Don Layton, Layton explained the purpose and role of the Credit Risk Transfer (CRT). Now, in Demystifying GSE Credit Risk Transfer: Part II – How, and How Well, Does It Work?, Layton dives into the behind-the-scenes of the CRT.“Today, over six years later, more than 70% of the credit risk on new single-family mortgages is transferred to private market investors,” said Layton. “Given that the two GSEs together have about $5 trillion of single-family mortgage credit exposure outstanding, this means very large amounts of risk are being transferred–something almost unimaginable when Freddie Mac introduced the first transaction as a somewhat experimental initiative in July 2013.As Layton notes, CRT operates across four different types of financial transactions: Securities Issuances, Insurance/Reinsurance, Lender Risk Sharing, and Senior/Subordinate. These transactions must work properly in order for a CRT to function smoothly and transfer risk correctly. On top of these four transactions, Layton notes that there are six key criteria by which to determine if a particular type of CRT is truly effective in transferring risk.Of the four transaction types, Layton found that two seem to be doing the job well, one is so non-transparent that the public can’t come close to determining how well it works, and one has material weaknesses that should be addressed by the FHFA if it is to be allowed to continue.The objective of the proposed six major requirements for CRT of GSE TBA-eligible mortgages to be truly effective from both the GSE and policy perspectives is to “deliver a risk transfer that operates both efficiently and effectively, with no loopholes, caveats or surprise exceptions such that the credit risk somehow boomerangs back to the GSE, and in a manner supportive of financial market stability.” Subscribelast_img read more

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PRO Act moving through statehouse in the political spotlight

first_img By Jon Zimney – March 13, 2021 1 209 Pinterest Previous articleUpton seeks to preserve MSA status for Niles-Benton Harbor metroNext articleChicago man arrested after police find pot after chase on US 20 bypass Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. (“Indiana State Capitol Building” by Drew Tarvin, CC BY 2.0) Ten years ago Indiana Democrats fought so hard against a right-to-work bill that they walked out of the Indiana House and stayed in Illinois for nearly six weeks. One year later Republicans pushed that bill through. That entire fight might be negated by a bill that could put an end to right-to-work laws in all states that have them.“This bill is a political giveaway to union bosses at the expense of American workers,” said Rep. Jim Baird (R-Ind.), after the House passed the Protecting the Right to Organize Act or the PRO Act. “It would force workers into union contracts, bar workers’ right to vote by a secret ballot, and undermine Indiana’s own right-to-work laws.”The PRO Act is being criticized by Republicans and many business leaders. It would make it easier for people to form and join unions. The National Labor Relations Board would have more power and union membership could be extended to independent contractors.It would also make right-to-work laws invalid.“Unions, of course, want everybody to be members. The opposite is they don’t have to join a union if they don’t want to. That’s basically right to work,” explained University of Indianapolis business professor and union historian Stephen Maple, for an upcoming radio special on the Democratic walkout from ten years ago.Republicans have argued that having a right-to-work law in Indiana has helped bring jobs to the state. Rep. Frank Mrvan, a Democrat representing northwest Indiana, said on the U.S. House floor that the PRO Act will stop union suppression.“Unions are the backbone of northwest Indiana’s economy,” he said. ” We must do all we can to strengthen the ability for all workers to form unions. For far too long state and federal laws have targeted union workers and their ability to position themselves and leverage.”An argument from Republicans is that the bill would hurt the gig economy by preventing independent contractors from working without having to pay union dues.“Heaven forbid we pass something that’s gonna help the damn workers in the United States of America,” shouted Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), from the House floor Tuesday. “Now stop talking about Dr. Seuss and start working with us on behalf of the American workers.” He was talking to Republicans.None of Indiana’s Republican representatives voted in favor of the bill. Both Democrats voted for it.It is likely not going to have the 60 votes necessary to pass in the U.S. Senate. Facebook WhatsApp IndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Twitter PRO Act moving through statehouse in the political spotlight Twitter Pinterest Google+last_img read more

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Video: Preview Show – Fontana

first_img___________________________________________________________________________________________We apologize. We are having technical issues with our comment sections and fan community and it is temporarily unavailable. We are actively working on these issues and hope to have it up and running soon. We are also working on enhancements to provide a better forum for our fans. We appreciate your patience and apologize for the inconvenience.last_img

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Moe Neal receiving the main share of SU’s carries

first_img Published on September 26, 2018 at 10:55 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @A_E_Graham Through four games, gap in touches is stark among the two running backs listed as co-starters on Syracuse’s depth chart. Junior Moe Neal has rushed 70 times for 346 yards and two touchdowns compared to 38 touches, 170 yards and five touchdowns from the senior Dontae Strickland.After starting the season listed as SU’s No. 1 running back, Strickland has fallen off Neal’s pace. The pair has been listed as co-starters since Sept. 17, the Monday following the Florida State game.Head coach Dino Babers has repeatedly said Syracuse (4-0, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) will ride with the hot hand at running back. Neal’s been the more productive back, and if the trend continues — Neal has rushed 14 more times than Strickland in the last two games — Neal will pace SU’s running backs against No. 3 Clemson (4-0, 1-0) on Saturday.“It’s whatever the coaches say,” Strickland said. “Whoever they want out there. And whatever number they call out will be out there getting the handoffs.”Each standing at about 5-feet, 11-inches tall, but separated by 13 pounds, Neal and Strickland are different runners.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textStrickland fits the three-down back mold, sturdy enough to take a bruising while effective in the open field and catching the ball. Neal is more of a scatback, dancing to the second level and bursting down the field. Strickland initiates contact. Neal skirts around it.Neal said of his play style: “Just a spark plug that can get the offense rolling,”Through a third of the season, Neal averages 4.9 yards per carry to Strickland’s 4.5. That difference may appear insignificant, but across the 139 handoffs to SU running backs this season, it represents a 50-plus yard difference.The closeness of those numbers seem less significant when looking at the usage of each back. Neal has nearly doubled Strickland’s touches. In all but one game — against Wagner, in which Neal and Strickland had nine each and Eric Dungey and Jarveon Howard individually toted the ball more — Neal has outcarried Strickland.Strickland was listed as the starter, but Babers favored the surging Neal, who opened the season with an 84-yard night on 2.9 yards a carry.The trajectory had been set. Neal outrushed Strickland, 71-35, on the same number of carries against Wagner. Howard had 69 of his own. The next week with Florida State visiting the Carrier Dome, Neal churned out 75 yards on 19 touches, Strickland 36 on 13.Babers hasn’t said much about his running backs, but he did offer a glimpse into his rationale for determining the share of touches.“I think if you’re a starter and you have the opportunity to play every snap then go ahead and play as many snaps as you can,” Babers said prior to SU’s game against UConn.Against UConn, Neal shredded the Huskies for 116 yards on 13 rushes. Strickland saved a five carry, 61-yard performance by ripping off a 51-yarder in the first quarter.Strickland’s main statistical edge  — along with catching more passes than Neal — is touchdowns.Neal has found the endzone twice and hasn’t scored since the opener. Strickland’s punched in five touchdowns and scored in three of SU’s four games. In short-yardage scenarios, Strickland has often been the favored option, bowling forward toward a goal line or first down.That tough yardage, along with pass protection, are both areas Neal has lacked in years past. Before the season, he said he made a point of emphasis to improve both facets.“I feel like I’ve been doing a great job of that,” Neal said on Sept. 18. “Past weeks, haven’t been letting up any sacks. Been protecting the quarterback, been going to my right man, making the right protection read.”Neal’s abilities as a ball carrier have pushed him to the de facto top of the depth chart. Now a junior, his pass blocking has improved. Syracuse has utilized him more frequently in situations where a bigger back like Strickland or Howard would previously have gotten the nod.“Everything’s coming together,” Neal said. “So I just try to keep getting better and better each and every week.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Warriors-Jazz cheatsheet: Utah is reeling, but don’t count them out

first_imgThe Utah Jazz are in the midst of a losing stretch, dropping four of their last five games. However, if history is any indicator, a run could be around the corner. Golden State is hoping they aren’t the first victim of a Jazz turnaround.Get to know all about the Jazz below. Where/When: Vivint Smart Home Arena, 6 p.m. (NBCSBA) Jazz projected starting lineup: Jae Crowder, Joe Ingles, Rudy Gobert, Ricky Rubio, Donovan MitchellJazz stock report: In what seems like an annual …last_img

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A Small Town Confronts a Tough Reality: Housing Costs Too Much

first_imgCreating a two-house templateThe firm’s first foray into affordable Passive House design was a project built in Hudson, New York, in 2014. The building consisted of two joined houses, each about 1,200 square feet. (For more on that project, see “Habitat Chapter Sees an Energy-Efficient Future.”)The project narrowly missed the Passive House performance mark, but monthly utility bills are less than $40, according to Wedlick, and the three-bedroom homes cost first-time homebuyers less than $800 per month, which includes mortgage, taxes, insurance, and utilities. As important, the experience helped BarlisWedlick fine-tune the design for future Habitat builds.“We do it every year, and we take the same model and we tweak it every year, and we improve the performance and the buildability of it, and the user friendliness of it, and the comfort level of it based on the way the previous home was used and built,” he said.Early designs used structural insulated panels, or a combination of SIPs and stick framing. Eventually, designers settled on double-stud walls as the most economical way of achieving high energy efficiency on a limited budget.By 2016, Columbia County Habitat for Humanity had sold its sixth Passive House duplex, and the ongoing effort got an organization called the Ancram Preservation Group wondering whether Passive House construction would help their community. A lack of affordable housing in Ancram was taking its toll, with a steady loss of population beginning to threaten not only its agrarian way of life but emergency and municipal services as well — no people moving into town, no volunteers at the local fire department. “No farm workers, no farms,” as Wedlick put it.“The smallest farming communities, like Ancram, are the places that are desperate for affordable housing and could not see any way to develop it, so they reached out to Habitat,” Wedlick said.Town leaders asked BarlisWedlick whether some unoccupied historic buildings in town could be rehabbed to Passive House efficiency levels, but the firm told them the duplex they had developed was the quickest and least expensive path to affordable housing. Wedlick’s network of contacts included some major landowners in town, and he approached one of them to ask whether he’d be willing to donate land for a house.“I just put it to him, ‘How is it sustainable that we have a wonderful county that has acres and acres of agricultural land to conserve but nobody that will take care of it can afford to live here,’ ” he said. “That’s not going to work.”It took some finagling and a zoning variance to clear the zero lot line building, but work is now underway on the first one in an Ancram hamlet called Ancramdale. BarlisWedlick is donating its time and expertise to the project along with the Levy Partnership and O’Leary Engineering. RELATED ARTICLES A new model for HabitatThe house design that BarlisWedlick has developed over time is a good fit for Habitat for a couple of reasons, Habitat’s Adams said in a call. It helps the agency, its volunteers, and homeowners feel like responsible citizens because the houses use less energy than a conventionally built home. Because the houses are attached and built on a small lot, their assessed value tends to run 20% to 30% less than two free-standing homes on larger lots would. That’s a big help in reducing what Adams called the “tremendous stress” of property taxes on many county residents.The $135,000 price tag doesn’t include the value of donated professional services or donated materials, Adams points out, and it’s 12% to 15% more than conventional building. But the houses are cheaper to own.“It’s not enough to get our families in a home,” Adams said. “We need to be as certain as we can be that they will be able to afford those homes for the terms of their mortgages, and most of those mortgages are 30-year mortgages.”The double-stud wall approach is appealing to volunteer builders, possibly because it reminds them of an old-fashioned barn-raising, Adams said, so it keeps participation at healthy levels. And the fact that the architects are continuing to tweak the design to improve it keeps volunteers engaged and coming back.There’s no doubt that building to the Passive House standard involves a learning curve for anyone, volunteer or professional, who’s making the shift from conventional to high-performance construction. Adams says the process gets a little easier over time, and crews consider it a “badge of honor” when the house is able to meet certification requirements. “Everyone just cheers,” she said.With some of the more finicky construction details under control and a successful template for new construction in hand, Adams sees an all Passive House future ahead. “All new construction will be Passive House, yeah,” she said. “Why go back?” An evolving designAs described by BarlisWedlick, the house at Ancramdale (located in Climate Zone 5A) will be built on a concrete slab that’s been insulated with 12 inches of Neopor, a graphite-impregnated expanded polystyrene insulation.Double-stud walls consist of two 2×4 walls on 24-inch centers. Walls are insulated with 2 inches of closed-cell polyurethane foam and about 10 inches of dense-packed cellulose. The trussed roof will be insulated with 24 inches of loose-fill cellulose.Windows are Alpen’s 725 series, a triple-glazed unit with two panes of glass and a suspended film between them.The principal air barrier is Zip sheathing and tape, on both the roof and exterior walls. A polyethylene vapor barrier will be installed beneath the slab. The cladding will be a mix of vinyl siding and vertical shiplap wood siding. BarlisWedlick calculates R-values as 56.8 under the slab, 41.4 in exterior walls, and 81 in the ceiling.Mechanicals consist of a one-head Mitsubishi ductless minisplit for heating and cooling, an electric water heater, and an energy-recovery ventilator. Habitat Chapter Sees an Energy-Efficient FutureLow-Income Housing: Problems and Solutions Can Low-Income Housing Be Energy-Efficient and Affordable?Affordable Housing is Leading Green BuildingHabitat’s High-Performance ExperimentHabitat’s Passivhaus Focus in Vermont A New Multifamily Will Put Passive House Performance to the Testcenter_img Where the design came from The Ancram Build, the latest version of a BarlisWedlick design, has its origins in the 2008 housing collapse and subsequent financial meltdown. When the housing bubble burst, work dried up for a lot of people in the construction business, including architects. Wedlick’s firm wanted to keep as much of its staff as possible, so the firm took on a “case study” project, a way of treading water while they waited for business to pick up.The firm had been commissioned to design a passive solar spec house in Columbia County. This also was about the time that Wedlick first became interested in Passive House design and completed a Passive House certification course. When the passive solar project was shelved, the architects decided to turn it into a Passive House project. They joined forces with a local builder who also was looking for a way to stay busy, and together built what became the Hudson Passive Project.“We had an incredible case study,” Wedlick said. “We could compare what was our best effort using passive solar techniques to a built Passive House version of the exact same design. The project got a lot of ink because nobody was doing anything at the time with the Great Recession, and it looked good where everything that had been done up to that time that was referred to as Passive House looked like a bunker. Ours did not.”With one wall made almost entirely of glass, and a wide open floor plan under a steeply pitched roof, the house in Claverack, New York, looked nothing like a bunker. After its completion in 2011, the Hudson Passive Project became the first certified Passive House in New York State. It also attracted the attention of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), which provided a third-party review and energy monitoring of the house for a year. A report published by the agency said the project could reduce overall energy use by 70% when compared to a code-minimum house, Wedlick said. Savings for heating energy were even better.Those numbers were very interesting to Brenda Adams, executive director of Columbia County Habitat for Humanity, the local affiliate that uses volunteer labor to build affordable housing. Adams invited the architects in to give a talk to people who worked on Habitat projects. Builders in the audience, Wedlick said, “ate it up,” and with support from Adams, BarlisWedlick offered to tweak existing house plans the agency was already using so the next Columbia Habitat house could be Passive House certified.“It was a turning point in my career, and I don’t say that lightly,” Wedlick said. “I’ve been working my whole career to make higher quality architecture available to more people than typically come across it. It’s always been rewarding in small ways to have felt I had some small impact on the marketplace, but really producing something that was affordable was never possible until Habitat volunteers showed me how to do that.“And not just any kind of affordable house but the highest quality performance house,” he continued. “It was really rewarding, and so we’ve been doing it ever since.” Wedlick and partner Alan Barlis are banking on an affordable housing model they first developed several years ago to make it possible for workers to live in the communities that need them. Low construction costs typical for Habitat for Humanity projects are key, but so are low operating and energy costs that come with Passive House construction. Wedlick calls the building template they have developed the “sweet spot of affordable homeownership.” It’s not technically a “duplex” because the two houses, separated by a common wall, are individually owned and sit on separate lots. Each house is about 1,300 square feet.The houses can be heated and cooled with a small fraction of the energy needed for a code-minimum home, and they can be built for $135,000 — or about $104 a square foot. “Our monthly carrying costs for a three-bedroom, two-bath house are about comparable to renting a two-bedroom apartment,” Wedlick said in a telephone call. Despite its close proximity to New York City, Columbia County has managed to hang on to its rural character and agrarian economy. More than 100,000 acres remain open fields and farmland, tended by farmers, foresters, carpenters, and a variety of other tradespeople. The Hudson Valley setting seems idyllic, but there’s a catch: the people who help keep farming alive can’t afford to live here.The median price of a home in one community, Ancram, is $289,000. Entry-level wages for many rural workers are less than $30,000 a year, not enough to carry the ongoing costs of owning a home.That’s the assessment of the architect Dennis Wedlick, and the reason for his partnership with Columbia County Habitat for Humanity and local officials in Ancram to develop affordable housing specifically for rural workers.Wedlick calls the effort to preserve open land and an agrarian way of life just 30 miles north of New York City “monumental.” The area is an important source of food for New York’s farmers’ markets, and the assumption has been that the rural workforce making all of this possible should be able to “live and thrive here for generations to come.”That’s the problem, Wedlick says. They won’t.“Unfortunately, in Columbia County and elsewhere in the Hudson Valley, agrarian-related occupations no longer provide entry-level compensation sufficient to purchase and maintain a home,” Wedlick wrote in a background report for a member of the New York State Assembly last year.last_img read more

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ConnectFX Nodes in Smoke: Auto Matte, Average & Auto Stabilizer

first_img30%-70%Stabilize objects that change their shape or depth, and exclude objects that are smaller or moving rapidly. Analysis: Aside from the obvious Analyze button to perform the track, you can adjust the ‘Scene Flexibility’.  Set the flexibility percentages based on your specific video needs. 0%-20%Stabilize a pan, tilt, zoom, or the motion of a single rigid object that is visible during the entire analysis. 80%-100%Stabilize all visible movements.center_img In our ongoing series on the ConnectFX Nodes in Autodesk Smoke we dive into Auto Matte, Average and Auto Stabilizer.Going alphabetically through the ConnectFX Nodes in Smoke, “Action” would be the next on the list (see our earlier post on the first few nodes).  However, Action is the most powerful node in ConnectFX, and is so deep that it needs a blog series of it’s own. It is the 3D compositing hub.  This series will explore all of the other nodes in ConnectFX, as they are tools that complement and support Action inside Autodesk Smoke 2013.Smoke’s Auto Matte NodeSmoke’s Auto Matte is a very basic node.  It functions a lot like 2D Histogram, but in a very stripped down way, with little UI feedback.  When a front clip is fed in to Auto Matte a high contrast image is made based on the luminance levels of the clip. (Click image for larger view)You can adjust the minimum and maximum values for the blacks and whites, which when the output is used as a matte input on another node, will give you more transparency and opaqueness to your keyed result.  There is also a Gain Adjustment which is processed after the min/max values are set.Smoke’s Average NodeSmoke’s Average Node is a great node for many uses, both practical and artistic. Average will simulate the motion blur of a moving object in a clip.  It bases the amount of blur on the number of frames set in the “Average Over” slider.  The higher the number the more frames will be blended together to make the simulated blur.You also have the option of a uniformed or weighted average.  This controls the amount of the fade of the blur. You can have each averaged frame fade uniformly or you can weight the frames that are closest to the target frame and they will be less transparent than later frames.  This will give you a more realistic trail blur, as the frames near the object in motion will be less transparent than the frames further away. The final option is to base the blur on just past frames or on both past and previous frames.A practical application for Average would be in using it to blend frames together to create a clean plate for a background.  With a lock-down shot, you can average the frames together which will blur out and fade the moving images and leave the background image untouched. However, a bit of softening may occur.  Average is a great way to add motion blur to an image that didn’t have it before, like sports images shot with a high shutter.             (Click on images for larger view of the before/after)On the artistic side you can use Smoke’s Average node to create a stylized look to video. Again a lock-down camera shot works great to make the moving images in the frame blur, add a bit of strobe to that and you have a very filmic 15 fps blurred fast motion result.  It can also be used to animate still graphics into a flowing motion background.   Or take almost any quick moving handheld shot, average multiple frames, add a little blur and color and you can make a smooth flowing animating background.Smoke’s Auto Stabilize NodeWhen you come back from a shoot and find that your handheld shots are a little shaky or bumpy on your driving footage because of a rough road, then Smoke’s Auto Stabilize is the node for you.  You can think of the Auto Stabilize node like the Warp Stabilizer in Adobe Premiere and After Effects – and like the stabilizer in FCPX.  I put the Auto Stabilizer to the test on a shot that I edited for WTHR-TV in Indianapolis, during Superbowl XLVI.  The shot was a time-lapse city shot where the photographer moved his tripod 6 inches every 30 secs and shot 5616 x 3744 still images using the Canon 5D. As you can see, this shot needed a lot of stabilization.The Auto Stabilize menu has a lot of options, but you can break it down in to 5 sections:  Analysis, Stabilization, Reference & Trackers, Offset, and Rendering.(Click image for larger view) You can set the clip range and even feed a matte to limit the area that will be tracked and stabilized.  You can choose to track in 2D or with perspective.  You can also negate the tracking data.  This is useful when you copy the node and reuse it later on to return the clips natural motion after you have done some other clean up or paint work on the clip.Instead of a matte you can use a square Region of Interest (ROI) to isolate the area to be tracked.  Once you tweak the settings you can analyse the clip.  Smoke tracks multiple points to get the most tracking data possible to generate the best stabilization and therefore the best image result. It will pick up new points as they come into view and drop others that are no longer of value to the analysis.Stabilization:  Now that you have the tracking data, you can finesse the result. The analysis happens on the front view for the image, so hit F4 to see the result. You have the option to turn off any stabilization to the X,Y, and Rotation components. This will allow you to keep any Y (vertical) camera motion and just stabilize the X (horizontal) for example.You can also change the camera motion for these components from fixed to smooth.  When you do that you will see the Smoothing options active.Now, here is where it gets fun.  You can change the amount of smoothing to the stabilization data. This will then add back some of the natural camera motion but just make it smoother, rather than stabilize it and lock it down completely.  It’s a great fix for handheld shots that were just too hand held, but still keep some of the natural motions.  This will also keep the edges of the image from tracking too much and getting too much cropping that you will have to deal with.Reference & Trackers:  If  the first frame of your clip is not the best representation of the stableness of your clip you can set the most optimal frame as the reference frame.  You will see the tracking marks on your clip throughout Smoke’s tracking analysis.(Click image for larger view)If the node tracks elements that are not helpful to the stabilization, like a person moving through the shot, you can highlight those trackers and delete them. This will update the stabilization curves and give a better result.Offset:  After the result of the track, you can add offsets in the X, Y, Scale, and Rotation to bring the image full.Render: You can change the canvas size for the end result and activate and set any hardware or software antialiasing.  There is also a repeat function for the edges, with  mirror, tile or repeat last pixel.Here is the same Indianapolis skyline clip with before and after stabilization.  Every shot is different so experiment with these Smoke Auto Stabilize settings to achieve your best result!last_img read more

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Set Down Your Push Broom

first_imgYou pushed your big “opportunity” from January to February. Then March. Then you pushed that same “opportunity” into the second quarter of the year.Just to be safe, you put the close date in for June 30th. You believed that this would provide you with plenty of time to push the “opportunity” across the line. And you did push the “opportunity” . . . just not across the line. Instead, you pushed the “opportunity” into the fourth quarter.Why are so many opportunities projected to close the last day of the quarter anyway? And why do these opportunities seem to always need to be pushed a little further ahead?It’s the end of the fourth quarter. The clock has run out. Are you really going to push that “opportunity” into the first quarter of next year?Instead, maybe push that trash into the dustpan, toss it away, and start working on a real opportunity. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Odisha tribals give NOTA warning to candidates

first_imgThe result of Odisha’s Koraput Lok Sabha seat, reserved for Scheduled Tribes, has served to caution politicians that the None Of The Above (NOTA) button on the electronic voting machines cannot be taken lightly.In fact, Koraput turned out to be the only face-saver for the Congress in the State. Its candidate Saptagiri Sankar Ulaka, with 3,71,129 votes, defeated his nearest Biju Janata Dal rival Kausalya Hikaka by a slender margin of 3,613 votes. Ms. Hikaka got 3,67,516 votes.Thumbs up for NOTABut the total number of votes cast under NOTA was 36,561 in this constituency. The winning margin of the Congress was much less than the votes cast under the NOTA option in this tribal-dominated constituency. It was around 3.4% of the total votes, while the winning margin was around 0.4%.Jayaram Pangi of the BJP was in the third position with 2,08,398 votes. Four of the seven contestants in this Lok Sabha seat got lesser votes than NOTA. Bhaskar Mutuka of the Bahujan Samaj Party secured 35,764 votes, Damodar Sobor of CPI-ML(Liberation) 26,117, Banamali Majhi of Ambedkarite Party of India 18,849, while Rajendra Kendruka of CPI-ML (Red Star) got 15,827 votes. According to Sudhakar Patnaik, a political analyst of undivided Koraput district, this indicates that voters of this so-called underdeveloped tribal constituency too are conscious about their voting rights and NOTA. “Even the maid who works at our home had asked me to explain NOTA to her a few days before polling,” he added.In 2014 polls too NOTA had played a similar role in the adjoining Nabarangpur Lok Sabha seat of the undivided Koraput district. BJD candidate Balabhadra Majhi had defeated his Congress rival by 2,042 votes, while the total number of votes cast under NOTA was 44,408.But even with this slender margin win, the Congress could regain its old bastion Koraput, after a gap of 15 years. Ample division of votes among seven candidates and NOTA is said to be a major reason behind the Congress win. Since its inception in 1957, the Koraput parliamentary constituency had remained a Congress bastion till 2004.last_img read more

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Rain havoc in western Maharashtra continues; Satara, Kolhapur flooded

first_imgLow-lying areas like Wakad, Pimple Saudagar, Aundh Gaon, Baner, Sinhagad Road were particularly affected as water flooded the streets and seeped through basements in residential areas, submerging private vehicles. Meanwhile, the situation remained grim in the ‘sugar heartland’ with massive discharge of water from the Koyna dam and the surging levels of the Krishna river throwing life and communications awry in Satara, Sangli and Kolhapur.According to Satara district authorities, the discharge from the Koyna dam, which was completely filled to capacity, had been increased to 1,03,000 cusecs.With the discharge severing communications between villages and tehsils, and and road traffic coming to a standstill, the administration has urged people to remain indoors.A similar situation was observed in Kolhapur district, where 17 vital roads were shut down following the extreme flood-like situation.The roundabouts, streets, arterial roads and other major connectors were submerged with waters from the Koyna dam. State Transport bus services remained inoperational in Sangli and Kolhapur.People living near the Krishna river were moved to nearby schools and shelters run by the municipal administration. “Kolhapur and Satara have recorded 101.8 mm and 84.8 mm rainfall respectively till Monday morning. The heavy rainfall is likely to continue for the whole of this week,” Dr. Kashyapi said, adding that Nashik also continued to be in the grip of unrelentingly heavy showers with Tamhini ghat recording 350 mm rain, Trimbakeshwar 396 mm and Nashik city recording 158 mm rain.He further said that the ghat areas would see heavy to extremely heavy rain in the next 72 hours while the normally arid Vidarbha region could expect heavy showers on August 7. Help at hand: An NDRF team rescuing people from inundated areas of Pune. | Photo Credit: Mandar Tannucenter_img There was no let-up in rains in western Maharashtra and the heavy downpour lead to increased discharge from overflowing dams in Pune and the districts in the sugar heartland, throwing communications off-kilter and flooding several parts of Pune, Satara and Sangli.Continuous discharge from dams in Pune — Khadakswasla (more than 49,000 cusecs), Mulshi (35,000 cusecs) and Pavana (20,000 cusecs) — since morning caused flooding in several low-lying areas and led to traffic police shutting down vital bridges between Pune and the Pimpri-Chinchwad which in turn resulted in massive traffic snarls.In wake of the grim traffic situation, Pune District Collector Naval Kishore Ram said the administration has decided to keep schools and educational establishments shut on Tuesday (August 6) as well.“More than 6,000 persons residing in the low-lying parts have been moved to safer areas by rescue teams of the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) and the Fire Department since Sunday following increase in the discharge of water from the dams,” said Mr. Ram, adding that the evacuated people were moved to shelters in schools set-up by the Pune civic body to cope with the crisis.While the rain momentarily loosened its grip over Pune city in the morning, it commenced with renewed vigour post-noon with robust showers lashing the city.Officials at the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said the grim situation in the State and over the city was likely to persist through the week and likely to improve only after August 9.“While Pune city is expected to receive moderate showers tomorrow, heavy rain is expected to continue in other parts of the district like Maval, which received 175 mm rainfall till Monday morning,” said Dr. Anupam Kashyapi, Head, Weather & Air Pollution Monitoring Unit, IMD, adding that the city was expected to record at least 40 mm rainfall by Tuesday morning.The traffic police closed down the bridge linking Aundh with the Sanghvi area after a portion of it was damaged by incessant showers, while the new bridge at Hinjewadi was shut off after cracks developed across the structure, throwing awry traffic along the Pune-Bengaluru highway.Several employees working with companies in the Hinjewadi IT Park were allowed to leave early or work from home as rising water levels completely cut-off communications between Pune and the areas of Wakad and Pimpri-Chinchwad.last_img read more

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