Ben’s first national fundraising event raises £10,000 for mental health support

first_img Melanie May | 10 January 2017 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  96 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: fundraising events mental health The event was part of a wider campaign around mental health, and was supported by celebrities Mike Brewer, Tiff Needell and Vicki Butler-Henderson, while the day also saw Volvo UK tie up with Sky Atlantic on Twitter; Autotrader’s David Hawksworth raise £400 through JustGiving, and Wheeler Dealers’ Mike Brewer encourage his fans to show support for the campaign.Zara Ross, chief executive of Ben, said:“We were delighted to see so many organisations supporting Hats on 4 Mental Health Day. We have been overwhelmed by the response we have had and the awareness surrounding the campaign has been phenomenal. One in three people will experience mental health problems at work, which means that over 260,000 people within the automotive industry will face these challenges at some point in their lives. The money raised from Hats on 4 Mental Health Day will go towards supporting those individuals to help them get their lives back on track.”The charity is planning to hold Hats on 4 Mental Health again in 2017. Ben’s first national fundraising event raises £10,000 for mental health support Ben, the charity that supports people in the automotive industry, has announced that its first national fundraising event has raised £10,000 to support automotive colleagues facing mental health challenges.Hats on 4 Mental Health Day took place across the UK on 10th November, and saw employees from around 90 companies wear their hats to work and donate to the charity. Participants were also to post their photos on social media under the hashtag #hatson4mentalhealth, which trended for several hours. About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  95 total views,  1 views todaylast_img read more

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Trucks boycott Limerick tunnel

first_img Previous articleLimerick claim Division 2 crownNext articleFour-bed home in Raheen for €130,000 admin Advertisement Print “We’re not using the Limerick Tunnel at the moment, because it’s not value for money.“We have tried to negotiate with Direct Route but they have no incentive to drop their price because their agreement with the NRA means the taxpayer will make up the difference”.At present, trucks are charged €5.80, which, says Eoin, would need to be dropped by €1.50 to become cheaper than travelling through the city.“Guys use it the odd time, but 90% still use the Dock Road and the tunnel was built to take heavy traffic out of the city”.Those engaged in the industry, he added, were not happy paying road tolls on top of road tax.“We want to see a system introduced that you pay for the days your truck is on the road, some weeks a vehicle could be parked up for three or four days”.Locally, he said that there has been a slight pick up in manufacturing in Shannon, but the airport is still underperforming.“We want to be involved in the planning process for the new Lynx Cargo Hub at Shannon airport, because will be a major stakeholders when it is up and running.“We have a few good fleets in the area at the moment, but we are at risk of losing them is the fuel issue isn’t addressed”.This was one of five issues he discussed in a recent meeting with Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar.“The number one problem is the price of fuel, which has gone up by 50% in the past 12 months”.He told the minister that a tax rebate on fuel needed to be introduced for the sake of the industry and the wider economy.“At present, hauliers exporting to the continent are buying all of their fuel abroad and the exchequer is losing out.“We want a tax rebate introduced similar to that in Belgium. This allows hauliers to claim back 8c a litre at the end of the year.“Last year, a Wexford haulier claimed back €1 million in VAT abroad”.They are now hoping to secure a meeting with Minister of Finance Michael Noonan.According to Mr Gavin, the minister recognised that hauliers, who employ about 60,000 in Ireland, are major stakeholders in the export economy.“The export industry is the strongest part of our economy at the moment and everything that’s exported has to be moved by road.“A tax rebate would restore confidence in the export market and inspire a bit of confidence in the haulage industry.“We understand the pressure that the Department of Finance is under, but we estimate it would be worth approximately €80 million to the exchequer”.“Everyone is losing out, from the guy you’re buying it off on the Dock Road, to the person buying a loaf of bread in the shop”.Eoin Gavin is originally from Sixmilebridge and his Bunratty- based company employs 13 people.He will be president of the IRHA for the next two years.“I want to change the perception that we are just big dirty trucks to something more like knights of the road”. Twitter Not value for money -IRHAAN estimated 90% of truck traffic is avoiding the new Limerick Tunnel, because it is not value for money.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up So claims Eoin Gavin, a Bunratty haulier, and newly appointed president of the Irish Road Haulage Association. NewsLocal NewsTrucks boycott Limerick tunnelBy admin – May 5, 2011 626 Linkedin Facebook Email WhatsApplast_img read more

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Governor Douglas and Vermont’s congressional delegation kickoff $70 million passenger rail improvement

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas, Senator Bernie Sanders, Congressman Peter Welch and a host of national and local rail officials and advocates today drove a golden spike along the tracks outside of the St. Albans Amtrak Station to signify the beginning of a two-year, $70 million construction project that will significantly improve track speeds along the Vermonter Passenger Rail line between St. Albans and New York City, with continuing service to Washington D.C.The project, which received $50 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, involves installing new rail, rail ties, crossing improvements including new signals, and bridge rehabilitation along the Vermonter’s 191-mile Vermont corridor.  Once complete, the improvements will reduce by about 30 minutes the time it takes the Vermonter to travel through the Green Mountain State.‘Over the long term, this project will greatly improve our passenger rail service as it is designed to dovetail with an additional $110 million in stimulus-funded track improvements in both Massachusetts and Connecticut.  Those improvements will ultimately result in a nearly 90 minutes reduction in the time it takes the Vermonter to travel from St. Albans to New York City,’ Governor Douglas said. ‘While in the short term, construction of the Vermont portion alone will generate an estimated 150,000 man-hours of labor over the next two years and provide much needed jobs to our region.’‘In Vermont, our infrastructure needs an enormous amount of work. Our rail system is totally inadequate and we must move to replace our Civil War-era train lines with high-speed rail. We are making progress,’ Senator Sanders said.  ‘I am pleased that we were able to secure $50 million through the federal stimulus program to improve ‘The Vermonter’ rail line, part of $160 million awarded to Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut to improve rail service between New Haven, Conn. and St. Albans, Vt.  That’s a good start, but much more needs to be done.’Governor Douglas and members of Vermont’s Congressional Delegation were joined at the St. Albans ceremony by Federal Railroad Administration Deputy Administrator Karen Rae, who praised Vermont’s efforts to improve the state’s intercity passenger rail service.‘President Obama’s push into high-speed and intercity rail truly is an historic time in the U.S.,’ Deputy Director Rae said.  ‘His commitment to rail will rebalance our national transportation system, create good jobs, promote interconnected livable communities, spur economic redevelopment, and decrease our carbon footprint and dependence on expensive foreign oil.’Earlier this year, Vermont received $50 million in stimulus funding to conduct track improvements along 191 miles of track owned by the New England Central Railroad. The railroad, in turn, contributed an additional $20 million to bring the total to $70 million worth of improvements. Railroad officials also attended today’s groundbreaking.‘We are extremely pleased to advance this project to the construction phase.’ said Charles Hunter, Director of State Relations ‘ East for the New England Central Railroad. ‘This project is a perfect example of a public-private partnership with shared benefits.’Aside from increasing passenger rail track speeds, freight rail will also benefit from this upgrade as the improvements will allow freight trains to run at the national rail freight car standard weight limit of 286,000 lbs verse the current 263,000 lbs that are possible along this stretch of track.Source: Governor’s office. 11.9.2010last_img read more

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AFSOUTH Takes Medical Readiness Expertise to Salvadoran Counterparts

first_img“The end goal for our collaboration in the area of quality improvement will be to develop a simple, but high-fidelity adverse event reporting system within the HMC,” said Maj. Neese. “This will serve as the cornerstone to a hospital-wide quality control program.” “The objective of the SMEE was to support El Salvador in strengthening their medical plan and building their capability to respond to the effects of natural and man-made disasters, as well as enhance and develop doctrine and information sharing structures in order to maintain the health readiness of the Salvadoran Air Force,” said U.S. Air Force Major Brian Neese, the Global Health Engagement Action Officer for AFSOUTH, the U.S. Air Force component of U.S. Southern Command. “The objective of the SMEE was to support El Salvador in strengthening their medical plan and building their capability to respond to the effects of natural and man-made disasters, as well as enhance and develop doctrine and information sharing structures in order to maintain the health readiness of the Salvadoran Air Force,” said U.S. Air Force Major Brian Neese, the Global Health Engagement Action Officer for AFSOUTH, the U.S. Air Force component of U.S. Southern Command. “In the short term, we hope to establish our own quality care and patient safety program that will allow us to improve the quality of our care by integrating all the personnel responsible for providing patient care, including doctors, nurses, and technical and administrative personnel,” explained Maj. Díaz. By Dialogo March 16, 2015 Medical specialists from AFSOUTH and the joint military residency training program at Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital (FBCH) in Virginia recently held a medical Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE) in San Salvador, El Salvador. Two international health specialists from Air Forces Southern (AFSOUTH), two family medicine staff physicians, and two family medicine residents from FBCH visited Hospital Militar Central (HMC) in San Salvador from February 9-13, to exchange information and train on medical readiness with their Salvadoran counterparts. They also simulated a mass casualty drill based on a real-life plane crash led by third-year residents, who verbalized the process of assessing their victims, their treatment plans, requesting the supplies needed, and describing the procedures they followed. The designated faculty facilitators then debriefed the residents on their performance and the U.S. personnel provided strategic and operational feedback on building and improving their mass casualty training scenarios as well as the holistic scope of a full disaster response training program. Capt. Lax said the residents at HMC expressed concern over having to read and understand medical journals in English, which makes it hard for them to keep up with current medical advances. “We have created a website where, once per month, HMC residents are given a significant journal article from the medical literature and then receive quizzes on their understanding of the article,” he said. “Empowering them to read the literature themselves and helping them understand will hopefully create a new generation of Salvadoran military physicians that are empowered to better their own medical system.” “In the short term, we hope to establish our own quality care and patient safety program that will allow us to improve the quality of our care by integrating all the personnel responsible for providing patient care, including doctors, nurses, and technical and administrative personnel,” explained Maj. Díaz. Centered around education and capacity building on one hand and quality improvement on the other, the exchange was divided into two domains. As part of the efforts to build the Salvadoran hospital’s capabilities, the medical personnel sponsored by AFSOUTH focused on enhancing the HMC’s staff training in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Basic Life Support (BLS), their readiness for disaster preparedness, and establishing a residency learning cooperative between FBCH and HMC residents. During a previous visit in August 2013, HMC and FBCH colleagues had specifically pointed out that quality assurance is a major potential project. So the SMEE also focused on developing this further. According to Maj. Neese, HMC’s Maj. Díaz showed a particular interest in leading an effort to build a quality control program at HMC, so the U.S. personnel helped him collect information by in-person interviews with HMC staff and a brief, informal survey to nurses and residents. Capt. Lax said the residents at HMC expressed concern over having to read and understand medical journals in English, which makes it hard for them to keep up with current medical advances. “We have created a website where, once per month, HMC residents are given a significant journal article from the medical literature and then receive quizzes on their understanding of the article,” he said. “Empowering them to read the literature themselves and helping them understand will hopefully create a new generation of Salvadoran military physicians that are empowered to better their own medical system.” “HMC sees a lot of pathology that our trainees are not routinely exposed to, and the same for the trainees at HMC,” explained Capt. Lax. “As a result of our trip, we have established a collaborative partnership to share cases and teach each other via video-conferencing.” The event also built on the long-term effort to establish a bilateral institutional relationship between the FBCH in Virginia and the HMC in El Salvador. “This event was unique for SOUTHCOM and AFSOUTH due to its emphasis on creating an institutional relationship between the residencies of both hospitals,” said U.S. Air Force Captain John Lax, Resident Physician at FBCH, who participated in the event. “Specifically, as a chief resident, I was able to establish a relationship for sharing of interesting cases between our two hospitals,” he added. “We’re convinced that today’s world is characterized by threats of a different nature, so international collaboration and cooperation are the best way to confront and overcome today’s and tomorrow’s threats,” he concluded. According to Salvadoran Army Major Carlos A. Díaz, chief of medical services and hospital care at HMC, “Exchanges like this one are very important in providing us ideas, valuable information, and a successful first-hand experience.” Medical specialists from AFSOUTH and the joint military residency training program at Ft. Belvoir Community Hospital (FBCH) in Virginia recently held a medical Subject Matter Expert Exchange (SMEE) in San Salvador, El Salvador. Two international health specialists from Air Forces Southern (AFSOUTH), two family medicine staff physicians, and two family medicine residents from FBCH visited Hospital Militar Central (HMC) in San Salvador from February 9-13, to exchange information and train on medical readiness with their Salvadoran counterparts. “The end goal for our collaboration in the area of quality improvement will be to develop a simple, but high-fidelity adverse event reporting system within the HMC,” said Maj. Neese. “This will serve as the cornerstone to a hospital-wide quality control program.” The event also built on the long-term effort to establish a bilateral institutional relationship between the FBCH in Virginia and the HMC in El Salvador. “This event was unique for SOUTHCOM and AFSOUTH due to its emphasis on creating an institutional relationship between the residencies of both hospitals,” said U.S. Air Force Captain John Lax, Resident Physician at FBCH, who participated in the event. “Specifically, as a chief resident, I was able to establish a relationship for sharing of interesting cases between our two hospitals,” he added. “HMC sees a lot of pathology that our trainees are not routinely exposed to, and the same for the trainees at HMC,” explained Capt. Lax. “As a result of our trip, we have established a collaborative partnership to share cases and teach each other via video-conferencing.” Maj. Díaz said that given their limited resources, training jointly was especially beneficial for HMC’s medical personnel. “Many times institutions like ours are faced with limited resources, both economic and in terms of personnel, so exchanges like these allow us to focus on precise strategies that can greatly affect the care we provide without having to use too many resources.” For example, he added, “using simulated scenarios of emergency situations as educational tools not only allows us to use sophisticated equipment, but also has a low-cost, long-range impact on our personnel’s training and readiness capability during real emergency or disaster cases.” Centered around education and capacity building on one hand and quality improvement on the other, the exchange was divided into two domains. As part of the efforts to build the Salvadoran hospital’s capabilities, the medical personnel sponsored by AFSOUTH focused on enhancing the HMC’s staff training in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Basic Life Support (BLS), their readiness for disaster preparedness, and establishing a residency learning cooperative between FBCH and HMC residents. “We’re convinced that today’s world is characterized by threats of a different nature, so international collaboration and cooperation are the best way to confront and overcome today’s and tomorrow’s threats,” he concluded. What’s going on is really sad. I don’t like it because it could happen to us Poor people…Everything going on in the world is so awful. The partners also discussed ways to build a sustainable, organic life support training program with future plans to augment their existing training and provide train the trainer courses in the future, whereby a small staff that trains and gets certified in a specific specialty can then spread the knowledge attained by teaching it to others. HMC currently serves as the primary learning institution for a surgical residency program and an internal medicine residency program in El Salvador, so the U.S. and Salvadoran teams discussed building a Learning Cooperative between the HMC’s internal medicine residency program and the FBCH’s family medicine residency program to include a journal club, case sharing, and joint lectures The partners also discussed ways to build a sustainable, organic life support training program with future plans to augment their existing training and provide train the trainer courses in the future, whereby a small staff that trains and gets certified in a specific specialty can then spread the knowledge attained by teaching it to others. They also simulated a mass casualty drill based on a real-life plane crash led by third-year residents, who verbalized the process of assessing their victims, their treatment plans, requesting the supplies needed, and describing the procedures they followed. The designated faculty facilitators then debriefed the residents on their performance and the U.S. personnel provided strategic and operational feedback on building and improving their mass casualty training scenarios as well as the holistic scope of a full disaster response training program. During a previous visit in August 2013, HMC and FBCH colleagues had specifically pointed out that quality assurance is a major potential project. So the SMEE also focused on developing this further. According to Maj. Neese, HMC’s Maj. Díaz showed a particular interest in leading an effort to build a quality control program at HMC, so the U.S. personnel helped him collect information by in-person interviews with HMC staff and a brief, informal survey to nurses and residents. HMC currently serves as the primary learning institution for a surgical residency program and an internal medicine residency program in El Salvador, so the U.S. and Salvadoran teams discussed building a Learning Cooperative between the HMC’s internal medicine residency program and the FBCH’s family medicine residency program to include a journal club, case sharing, and joint lectures Maj. Díaz said that given their limited resources, training jointly was especially beneficial for HMC’s medical personnel. “Many times institutions like ours are faced with limited resources, both economic and in terms of personnel, so exchanges like these allow us to focus on precise strategies that can greatly affect the care we provide without having to use too many resources.” For example, he added, “using simulated scenarios of emergency situations as educational tools not only allows us to use sophisticated equipment, but also has a low-cost, long-range impact on our personnel’s training and readiness capability during real emergency or disaster cases.” According to Salvadoran Army Major Carlos A. Díaz, chief of medical services and hospital care at HMC, “Exchanges like this one are very important in providing us ideas, valuable information, and a successful first-hand experience.” last_img read more

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Will blockchain change the world?

first_imgAny time a tech innovation reaches the mainstream, it’s accompanied by an intense hope: Could this be the long-awaited answer to all of our problems?So, naturally, blockchain technology is having something of a moment.Much of the reason the technology has people so excited is its promise to inject transparency and immutability into any situation, project, or process it’s tracking.These qualities make it possible for us to imagine a single source of truth: One ultra-secure system that stores every piece of data we will ever need, never forgets it, and makes it available to everyone.What is blockchain?Blockchain technology, in its essence, is an unchangeable, shared ledger. Transactions are recorded chronologically and shared publicly. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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No recession on horizon, says NAFCU economist

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Total retail sales increased 0.5 percent in May, and April’s sales growth was revised upward from -0.2 percent to +0.3 percent. NAFCU’s Curt Long noted that strong gains in consumer spending may diminish the chances of a recession in 2019.“Household saving rates are at normal levels, so any growth in real wages would represent an upside risk,” said Long, NAFCU’s chief economist and vice president of research, in a NAFCU Macro Data Flash report. “There are plenty of downside risks to fret over, from the trade war to energy prices to a weak May jobs report, but NAFCU believes a recession is not in the cards this year.”Year-over-year growth in retail sales was 3.2 percent in May, which was down from 3.7 percent in April. Core retail sales increased 3.2 percent from a year ago, and auto and gas sales grew 3.1 percent. continue reading »last_img read more

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How the Binghamton Zoo is staying alive while it waits for reopening

first_imgBINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Binghamton Zoo at Ross Park says the pandemic hasn’t been easy on zoos across the nation, especially now that they have to wait for phase four to reopen. The zoo says it will first open to members and then open up more to the public when phase four of reopening allows foot traffic back into the park. “I’m not so much worried about this summer,” said Ginter. “I’m more worried for the coming winter when we can’t be open.” “We’ll be kind of eliminating where there would be two-way traffic,” said Ginter. “We’ll be installing decals on the pavement in high traffic areas to just make sure people don’t occupy the same space…as well as putting up signange throughout the zoo to remind people about social distancing.” Executive Director of Binghamton’s Zoo, Phil Ginter, says they’ve had a backup supply just in case, but having to stay closed during three months of their main season has been tough.center_img In order to comply with CDC guidelines and to make people feel comfortable, Ginter says they’ve changed things around the zoo. For example, they will have hand sanitizer stations as well as sensors put in the bathrooms so people don’t have to touch sink or toilet handles. The zoo has been raising money on social media to keep its emergency fund going in order to help feed the animals and provide them medical assistance. If you would like to donate to help the zoo, click here.last_img read more

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Atlas for the implementation of the software solution signed a contract with Lemax

first_imgLemax continues its success, and after signing the largest global contract since its inception, continues to conquer the domestic market, signing a contract with Atlas on the implementation of the Lemax solution. The solution, entirely created by Croatian knowledge, Croatian investments and the work of Croatian experts, will be successfully implemented, while the entire integration is expected by April 2019.The implementation of the Atlas solution will ensure coverage of all segments of the tourism business, enable the acceleration of business processes, long-term savings, easier monitoring of end customers and service users, and a comprehensive coverage of travel agency activities.”The integration of Lemax in Atlas is only the first step, and our ultimate goal is to integrate the solution into the business of the entire group. We must not forget that man was and remains the key to success in tourism, and the best technological solution will open a new space for the development of all business segments. We are extremely pleased to choose a domestic solution that covers all our needs. ” said Tomislav Varga, President of the Management Board of Atlas and adriatica.net group.IWe are very pleased to choose a domestic solution that covers all our needs – Tomislav Varga, ATLASThe Lemax solution improves the business of travel agencies by increasing employee efficiency, increasing sales through a range of marketing and sales functionalities, and reducing the possibility of human error by advanced automation. Namely, Lemax enables complete automation of the sales process, from the moment the agency receives a request for a tourist service, through checking the availability of that service with the supplier, all the way to payment and preparation of invoices and offers. All under the clear message “While the system works for them, employees can focus on business growth”. “We are proud that Atlas has chosen us as a partner to implement the software solution. The fact that the revenues of our customers around the world are growing from year to year is an indicator that we provide a top product. Our experts have first-class knowledge in development and implementation, and we are convinced that Atlas’ business with the new software will reach a higher level.. ”Said Lemax Director Mate Kostovski.Lemax’s solution is currently among the best software for travel agencies and tour operators in the world, becoming a synonym for quality, but also a recognizable brand that meets the needs of today’s modern travelers. And the most important thing for the end or as a point on the “i” is a 100% Croatian product.RELATED NEWS:last_img read more

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In 2018, Croatia Airlines carried a record number of passengers

first_imgIn 2018, the aircraft of Croatia Airlines, the Croatian national carrier, carried a total of 2,168.863 passengers, which is a record number of passengers in the company’s history and 2 percent more than in 2017. Record passenger traffic was also recorded at the level of May, during which, for the first time since the start of commercial flying in 1992, more than 200.000 passengers were recorded. Nearly 214.000 passengers were transported, the largest number of passengers in May in the company’s history. Last year, 1,642.285 passengers were recorded on Croatia Airlines’ international flights, which is 3 percent more than the year before, while passenger traffic on domestic flights remained at the same level as in 2017 (a total of 526.578 passengers).  Last year, CA started flying to two new destinations, Mostar throughout the year and Dublin during the summer season, and new seasonal routes Dubrovnik – Munich and Split – Copenhagen were introduced. Due to the positive travel trend, the company welcomed the jubilee two millionth passenger in 2018 16 days before it was in 2017.last_img read more

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Japan’s Marubeni acquires 5 percent stake in Siloam Hospital

first_imgJapanese conglomerate Marubeni Corporation has agreed to acquire a 5 percent stake in PT Siloam International Hospitals (Siloam), a publicly listed hospital chain controlled by PT Lippo Karawaci, as part of its plan to expand into health care in Indonesia.Masayuki Omoto, the chief operating officer of Marubeni’s Next Generation Business Development Division, said in a statement made available to the press on Wednesday that the strategic partnership with Lippo Karawaci and the acquisition of Siloam’s shares were part of the Japanese company’s program to further its presence in Indonesia.“We are pleased to be growing our presence in Indonesia and look forward to a long-term partnership with Lippo and Siloam,” he said. Topics : The investment in Siloam and strategic partnership with Lippo Karawaci will form the foundation of Marubeni’s expansion into healthcare infrastructure and services in Indonesia.Meanwhile, John Riady, the chief executive officer of Lippo Karawaci, said he hoped the partnership with Marubeni would help Siloam to further develop its business and “improve health care for all Indonesians”.Siloam, established in 1996, is the country’s largest private hospital operator with more than 13,000 doctors and nurses, 36 hospitals and 7,557 beds across Indonesia.  (hen)last_img read more

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