Charlotte Maxeke’s home to become a museum

first_img9 March 2015The house of struggle stalwart Charlotte Maxeke, one of the leaders of the famous 1956 Women’s March, is to be converted into a museum and interpretation centre, Gauteng Infrastructure Development MEC Nandi Mayathula-Khoza announced on Sunday.Mayathula-Khoza delivered the keynote address on behalf of Gauteng Premier David Makhura at an event held at Kliptown’s Walter Sisulu Square of Dedication to mark International Women’s Day,She said remembering Maxeke in this way would enhance “the clarion call of the UN Women’s Beijing +20 campaign: Empowering women, empowering humanity – picture it!”She said the Gauteng government had proposed the theme, “Make it happen: together moving Gauteng city region forward for women” for this year’s International Women’s Day celebration.‘Gender priorities’“We decided to partner with women from all walks of life and sectors in this celebration to give expression to gender priorities . and to showcase programmes and direct service-delivery initiatives to improve women’s lives in partnership with women’s organisations,” she said.Charlotte Maxeke (nee Manye) was born in Ramokgopa in the Polokwane (Pietersburg) District on April 7 1874. A religious leader, social worker and political activist, she is known as the “Mother of Black Freedom” in South Africa.Maxeke’s name has been given to the former Johannesburg General Hospital, which is now known as the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital. Durban has a street named after her and the South African Navy has named a submarine in her honour, the SAS Charlotte Maxeke.Mayathula-Khoza said the provincial government was also celebrating the 1954 Women’s Charter, which aimed to unite women in common action for the removal of all political, legal, economic and social obstacles and to strive for women’s rights.The MEC praised the provincial government for the achievements in improving the quality of lives of women: “We have removed laws, regulations, conventions and customs that discriminate against women. More women today occupy positions of power in all spheres of life. We continue to accelerate the implementation of gender equality and women empowerment policies.“We are determined to pursue the goal of 50/50 representation in all decision-making positions. In fact here in Gauteng, we have 60% of women representation in the [provincial] cabinet . and 50% representation of women in the Gauteng legislature,” she said.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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An Interview with Dr. Iain Walker on Ventilation

first_imgThe debate over how much to ventilate a home has been going on a long time. Last year, Building Science Corporation introduced its own standard to compete against ASHRAE 62.2 because (according to Dr. Joseph Lstiburek) of problems that weren’t adequately addressed in the ASHRAE standard. I’ve written about the standard and interviewed Lstiburek and ASHRAE 62.2 committee chair Paul Francisco. (See links at bottom.)Recently I interviewed building scientist and ASHRAE 62.2 committee member Iain Walker, PhD, about the issues. We had a great discussion, but make sure you read to the end. You don’t want to miss what he says about the ERV flaw you’ve probably never heard about. Also, be sure to attend the ACI national conference, where Walker, Lstiburek, and several others will be on a panel debating this issue.Allison Bailes: What do you think of the great ventilation debate that’s happened over the past year and Joe Lstiburek going rogue and creating his own residential ventilation standard?Iain Walker: I don’t know that there’s much debate happening really. You know, we have one national standard that is being used more and more, and I think that’s the way it’s going to continue. So I’m not sure there’s very much debate going on.Bailes: Do you see any value at all in the issues that Joe’s brought up? Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. RELATED ARTICLES How Much Fresh Air Does Your Home Need?Ventilation Rates and Human Health Resistance May NOT Be Futile in the Residential Ventilation WarsAn Interview with Dr. Joseph Lstiburek ASHRAE 62.2 Committee Chair Defends Ventilation StandardVentilation Requirements for Weatherized HomesDesigning a Good Ventilation System Make sure you register for the ACI national conference in Detroit because Iain, Joe Lstiburek, Paul Francisco, and several others will be on a panel debating the issue of residential ventilation. Duncan Prahl of Ibacos and I will act as moderators. Register now! The Early Bird deadline is 31 March 2014. Walker: Well, it depends on what you mean by issues. Most of the issues have been discussed at length by the 62.2 committee on and off. Certainly some of them, the 62.2 committee is investigating in great detail.I’ll give you an example. One is this idea of maybe the standard should require filtration. Currently it has a very weak requirement for something like a MERV 6 filter. But MERV 6 filters don’t really filter out the size of particles we’re concerned about for health. So maybe we should have a requirement for that and we haven’t figured out what that would look like and how to make it equitable across different systems and different climate zones and different homes, so it’s complex to find something in that area that’s suitable for a national standard, but certainly we’re looking into it.We’re not dismissing Joe’s concerns, and to be fair they’re not just Joe’s concerns. We all know what to do to improve indoor air quality. The question is always how to get it to work right in the standard.Bailes: OK, getting into what’s probably the biggest difference between 62.2 and Joe’s standard, what do you think of his idea to require different rates for different ventilation types, central-fan-integrated supply vs. exhaust-only vs. balanced?Walker: Well there’s been a lot of work done in this area, and the difficulty is that different systems are better in different circumstances. This makes it very difficult to say can we always credit one system or another, and I would say, no, we can’t. This is what the 62.2 committee decided also because you can create a scenario in which whatever ventilation system you like is better or worse, but overall the answer is there is no one better system from the point of view of achieving the indoor air quality that we’re looking for here.Bailes: In Joe’s standard, the system that has to ventilate at a greater rate, because he feels like it’s not as effective, is exhaust-only. He has cited Armin Rudd’s study of two homes in Texas as evidence to support that, but you’ve said there are other studies contradicting that. Can you go into that?Walker: Sure. Well, on the issue of what’s better, there’s a whole bunch of papers that were published several years ago — Max Sherman and I wrote several of them and a few other people were involved, too — looking at this exact issue: Should you mix? Shouldn’t you mix?We all agree that there’s certainly an advantage to running a central system that filters the air. I think we all agree on that but the question is, now how do we compare that to the filtration provided to the building by an exhaust system? And people have researched that and found out that the building envelope is something like MERV 9, but it depends a lot on how leaky the envelope is. The tighter the envelope, the more filtration you get. The looser the envelope, the less filtration you get. And indeed that’s what the 62.2 committee has been saying: that if you’re going to give a credit for filtration, we have to figure out the effective filtration for all systems, and it is a little tricky to deal with.There are other things, like the difference between a balanced system and an unbalanced system. In a balanced system, you can simply add the infiltration rate to whatever ventilation rate you’ve got. But you can’t do that with unbalanced systems. The 62.2 standard has been silent on that issue. It just says, you know, here’s the flow rate. We don’t care if you do balanced or unbalanced. Frankly, I think it’s probably going to continue that way, mostly for simplicity. There’s a big interest in keeping it simple from the users of the standard, builders and contractors.As we’ve said many times, the standard is just a minimum performance. You can always do better. And the implication there is if you say you use an HRV or ERV that’s balanced, and you provide quite a bit more ventilation, well you go ahead, and that’s great. You’ve complied, and you’ve got a better system. You’re providing heat recovery.That’s great also because the standard doesn’t say anything about requiring heat recovery either. That’s a better system, and the standard says, go ahead and use it. No problem at all. We don’t have to have anything in the standard that deals with that for that very reason. You can always do better if you want, because the standard is focused on: what’s the worst you can do and still have a reasonable indoor air quality? That’s the basis of the standard. You can always do better than that. That’s why it’s silent on this balanced vs. unbalanced issue.Bailes: Well, that gets me to my next question. A few weeks ago you said that it’s “dangerous” if you ventilate less than the 62.2 rate. Why do you think it’s dangerous? I think you were talking about less because you kind of confused better and more. You said you can always do better than ASHRAE 62.2, but does that mean more?Walker: Well, OK, let’s answer that question first. If you’re concerned about diluting indoor air pollutants, you do that by bringing in more outdoor air. But you can also remove pollutants by deliberately filtering for particles. There are also filters that will remove some of the chemicals, but they’re a little obscure and we don’t see them very much.We certainly see filters all the time, and it’s almost trivial these days to go into a store and buy yourself a better inline filter and stick into your forced air system. Or you can get units that just service a room. You can go out and buy these things now, and that will provide better indoor air quality because you’re deliberately doing something extra to remove those pollutants. So there are all sorts of ways to get to better indoor air quality.You can also — we do this in California — we say you can’t use high VOC-emitting materials in buildings. That’s a great idea for improving indoor air quality, much better than trying to ventilate it away or to scrub it with a filtration system. If you don’t bring polluting things into the home, that is obviously a great idea.The final point on this is that sometimes the outdoor air quality isn’t good. It’s very difficult to dilute indoor air pollutants if the outdoor air quality isn’t very good. But that’s something that’s very difficult for us to deal with in an IAQ standard because there’s a lot of regulation for outdoor air that is really beyond the scope of what we’re trying to do with the ASHRAE standard.Frankly, I think in the U.S., the actions of the EPA are keeping our outdoor air pretty good. It’s not always great, but it’s pretty good in most places. That’s actually great, and I think that the EPA and lots of other people are doing outdoor air research and making that cleaner, and we’ll let them continue to do that.I don’t think the ASHRAE 62.2 standard is going to try and deal with outdoor air pollutants in any significant way as a minimum standard. I mean you can always do better. You can envision some sort of control system that if you know there’s high ozone outdoors, you might want to turn off your ventilation for an hour or two and control that way. You can certainly do that, but I don’t think we would require that as a minimum performance specification.Now that was the second part of your question. So there are many aspects to achieving good indoor air quality. It’s not just ventilation. There are all these other possibilities, like source control and filtration and that sort of stuff.Remind me again what was the first part of your question.Bailes: The first part was about your comment about it being dangerous to…Walker: Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, OK, “dangerous” might be a little bit of a strong word, but I think that the objectives are manifold for the standard. Indoor air quality is sort of a broad term, so I just want to break it down a little bit.I think we’re getting much more of an emphasis on health than we used to have. Traditionally, we used to ventilate mostly for things like odors and moisture control. They were the prime drivers historically. And by historically, I mean going back thousands of years up until twenty-odd years ago. Just because health is a very difficult thing to deal with because there’s a lot of things that affect health and everybody responds differently. We’re only just getting enough knowledge to make some reasonable health decisions.The danger, if you will, of not ventilating to the 62.2 level, sort of combines all these things together. We know historically about odor control and we know about moisture control, and you could impact things like mold growth, which is a health problem, or degradation of surfaces, which is a structural problem. But also, we’re ventilating for chemicals we know are problems. I should speak more broadly — pollutants we know are problems, because it’s not just chemicals.The most significant pollutant from a health perspective is particles, in fact. There have been studies done that have measured concentrations of these things in homes. And we know enough about some of these components of indoor air quality and what their health effects might be and the levels we’re setting in 62.2 are at about the point where we think we’re reasonably dealing with most pollutants and most circumstances.Now we’re obviously going to be able to deal with extreme events or unusual things, but all a standard can do is work most of the time for most homes for most people, and we’re never going to capture every single possibility. That’s just unreasonable.The problem with going below that is that the levels of various pollutants could build up to the point where we could not say, “this protects most people most of the time” anymore. This is the consensus of a whole bunch of people on the committee with all sorts of backgrounds representing all sorts of interests.Our European friends, of course, are occasionally critical of our standard because they say our ventilation rates are actually much too low. They like much higher rates, and their ventilation standards are considerably higher than 62.2.But, you know, there has to be some sort of judgment applied here and this is where we are now. This is what the knowledge of all the people who have worked in this area for long time is a reasonable number to go for to protect against indoor air quality issues that affect a substantial number of people a substantial amount of time.I think that if you want to ventilate a home, that’s a good target. If you go below that, you’d better have some pretty good evidence that it’s OK. You better have some pretty good large-scale studies or a reasonable consensus among a lot of people representing a lot of points of view that actually it’s OK to go to, say, half that air flow rate. Currently we can’t say that.The danger in picking lower numbers without any backing is, is that even real? If you think of yourself as a contractor installing ventilation systems, and you install us a very low flow — one that is below 62.2 — and there is an indoor air quality problem and somebody sues you, the danger there for a contractor is you would be successfully sued, because 62.2 basically represents the current recommendations of good practice in our industry. If you’re going to go significantly below that level, you’d better… [garbled recording]. If you get sued, you’d be in a lot of trouble because you’re not taking the advice of your industry. It just creates a minefield, frankly, that I don’t think anybody should want to walk into.Bailes: But the minefield is mainly because there’s this standard that says you need to ventilate at this rate, and the standard isn’t based on a lot of hard health data and epidemiological studies. Right?Walker: That’s right, but it’s based on a lot of knowledge about air flow in buildings and pollutant emission rates and pollutant concentrations and the health impacts of them. We can say a lot of good stuff without needing large-scale epidemiological studies that would answer things with a great deal of certainty.And frankly, we’ll never have those studies. You’d have to cover so many climates, so many different pollutant generation rates, such a wide group of people, and you’d have to do intervention studies where you ventilate and didn’t ventilate. We’re never going to have that large-scale epidemiological information, so we have to do the best with what we know.And what we know is we have some pretty basic physics going on about dilution of pollutants if you know their emission rates. And even if you know their emission rates vary, like with formaldehyde, we have good models of how that works. We know the science of how that works. And we have some pretty good health data on — not all the pollutants, I would say, but certainly the significant ones that show up a lot in many houses that have health impacts like particles, oxides of nitrogen, and some things like formaldehyde that people are more familiar with.Then there are some marginal things like water vapor, which isn’t necessarily directly a health impact, but the effect of water vapor can be a health impact as a second order thing. So I think we know enough to be making reasonable decisions and that is what the ASHRAE committee is all about. It’s about knowing enough about the science of this to make a reasonable decision.Bailes: One more question about 62.2: What do you think would make the 62.2 standard better, and where do you think the committee is going with it?Walker: The committee — I mentioned this a few minutes ago — is actively thinking about, should we have some kind of air filtration requirement, mostly to account for particles, because particles are so important from a health perspective. The committee is actively working on this right now. I can’t predict when we’ll have something concrete in the standard. That’s always a very difficult and a dangerous thing to do, but I can tell you that this is a subject that the 62.2 committee is very interested in and is working on very hard at the moment.We’re bringing some new people onto the committee and getting people to come and give presentations. So I think the issue of filtering air is going to be an interesting topic in the future for the standard. I think that the major change we’re likely to see going forward is that because I think there may be some other detailed things that the standard…I personally don’t think the standard … isn’t going to have to act on … because of other things happening, but it’s important to talk about and that is issues about combustion safety and this idea of unvented combustion in a home. The reason why this is an issue for the standard is because combustion produces a lot of pollutants that we don’t want to have in our home, a whole broad range of them.In the home performance community there’s a great interest in this, because when we go into homes and tighten them, we do combustion safety testing, for example, or when homes are rated, there’s combustion safety testing also. I think that this is, from an indoor air quality perspective, burning stuff in your home is crucial.This leads me to the next point that I think we might see coming in 62.2, and that is a better way of dealing with kitchen exhaust. Here I’m talking primarily about range hoods. Because cooking, whether you’re burning gas or cooking with electricity, produces all sorts of pollutants, and it’s probably the major source of pollutants in your home for most people, unless you’re doing something really extreme.Venting those pollutants correctly — as in, you want to exhaust them directly to outside — that’s the preferable way of dealing with it. Right now the standard says you’ve got to have a range hood with 100 cfm of exhaust or you can ventilate the kitchen at a higher air flow rate overall. But we’re learning more on how they work.And range hoods don’t capture all the cooking pollutants when you turn them on. So we’re working with ASTM, not with the ASHRAE 62.2 committee. We have an ASTM committee looking into: Could we develop a capture efficiency test method so range hoods could be rated for their capture efficiency?Then what the 62.2 standard could do — or any other ventilation standard, or even building codes for that matter — they could say, yes, you’ve got to install a kitchen range hood with a minimum capture efficiency of, say, 75%. But until we have the test method in place that actually rates the range hoods, standards like 62.2 or mechanical codes can’t require a capture efficiency because there’s no test method. I think we will see something along those lines happening in the next couple of years.We have a really good group of people together developing the ASTM test method for capture efficiency. The industry as a whole — and by industry, I’m including the people who manufacture kitchen ventilation products as well — is very interested in seeing this go forward, and I think we’ll see that change in ventilation standards within a couple of years that deals a lot better with how we deal with capture efficiency of exhaust and does a much better job of ventilating kitchens.A little add-on to that is this issue of: Well, do people even turn these fans on? Whether it’s in kitchens or even in bathrooms, too. The standard does require that you install exhaust fans in kitchens and bathrooms, but they’re user-operated, so you’re there cooking and you turn it on or you’re having a shower and you turn it on.Another area that’s developed in 62.2 is, maybe we should automate these things. I’m thinking more particularly about kitchen ventilation and how range hoods operate. If people don’t turn on their high-capture-efficiency range hood, it doesn’t help them at all. We have to know it operates.There are a few manufacturers out there making automated range hoods. This is another possibility for a requirement. Not only will we have to have good capture efficiency but there will be some specification about how you automate a range hood so that whenever you turn on a burner to boil a pot of water or turn on the oven to bake some bread, the ventilation system in the kitchen turns on automatically.We’re currently at the beginning steps of that. We’ve done laboratory testing of the current control systems, and there’s a big range of performance. Some are good and some are poor, so we may have to have a standard for that, too, given the range of performance. That’s certainly something I think could have a really good impact on indoor air quality in homes, whether it’s in the 62.2 standard or in the plumbing and mechanical codes.I’ll be honest with you, when people ask me what’s the single biggest thing they can do to improve the indoor air quality in their homes, I always tell them to use their range hood. That’s so easy to do. You flip a switch. You don’t have to purchase anything. You’re not buying a fancy filtration system. That’s the first thing to do, and I think that the ASHRAE standard and these codes are very interested in these sort of things that are relatively simple but could have a substantial effect on indoor air quality without having to increase ventilation rates. We could really have some big effects there.Those areas are where I see the whole business of indoor air quality advancing in the near future: active filtration and doing better with kitchen exhaust on several levels. That’s where there’s a lot of activity right now. That’s where I see us improving our indoor air quality efforts in the near future.Bailes: At the Dry Climate Forum, I think you talked about ERVs recycling formaldehyde and sending it back into the house rather than outdoors because it behaves like water. Can you talk about that?Walker: Yeah, this is an interesting perspective. I just want to be clear — we’re talking here about ERVs, which exchange moisture as well as heat, not HRVs. This is an issue for ERVs. The issue for ERVs is that as you’re exchanging moisture between the two air streams, maybe other things get transferred, too. The particular pollutant that we’re concerned about is formaldehyde, because formaldehyde, from a chemical point of view, looks a lot like water. It’s quite a similar molecule.We’ve done some testing to look at this in our laboratory to see how much formaldehyde might get transferred between the incoming and outgoing air streams. In other words, if you operate this ERV, maybe you’re not getting rid of the formaldehyde like you think you are. That was our question.Indeed we found that there can be substantial transfer, but it depends a lot on the specific materials that are used in the ERV to do that transferring of the moisture. It’s very specific to the particular way of doing it. Also, there are differences between ERVs.There are basically two ways of exchanging the moisture. Some do it through a membrane, and the second one is with a wheel that spins between the two air flows. The wheel ones we’ve always had some concern because there’s always some bypass about where the wheel goes from one air stream to the other. There’s always a little bit of air leakage there. In fact to be fair to ERV ratings, that bypass is included in the ratings, so the ratings are good. This is all included in that.The concern from an indoor air quality point of view is what is that bleed air and the fact that you’ve got a wheel rotating from one air stream to another is actually transferring pollutants. The answer is, yes, it is, but unfortunately, I can’t just tell you, well, it’s 10%. There isn’t a number.It depends a lot on the materials used and how the ERV is designed and how well it’s sealed to prevent that sort of transfer. We’re shortly going to have a paper on that. There was some work done by other people at LBNL. I was only peripherally involved and I did not write the paper.The ERV manufacturers are taking this very seriously. I can’t make any promises, but we’ve had some very good discussions with them about this issue. Where I think we’re going to end up is, because we can identify the various materials that are used to transfer the moisture and unfortunately some formaldehyde, we can also pick materials that are much better at transferring the moisture and not formaldehyde, and the manufacturers are going to switch the materials they use. This is where I believe we will be shortly because the manufacturers are very aware of this. They’re concerned and they want to do the right thing, so I think that’s what’s going to happen.Currently it’s a bit of a caveat emptor for ERVs. If you want some advice, I would say try and avoid the ones with the disk wheel if you’re looking at an ERV for now. We believe this issue is going to go away, because we think changing the materials will be able to solve this problem. But right now it is a concern. There are some ERVs that are better than others, and no way for a purchaser to know, because they’re not rated for this.last_img read more

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What should be the requirements in IoT communication?

first_imgTags:#data security#Internet of Things#IoT#Knowmail#privacy Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Eran Abramson Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… The future is coming fast, connectivity is a commodity, and IoT is upon us; steadily taking shape, growing in popularity, and becoming a reality.To assure growing adoption rates and usage, there are certain requirements and caveats on which we must agree. Otherwise, it will either be a passing trend or just an early adopter’s hope for mass acceptance.So for IoT to truly become the “next thing” with all devices and users connected in and out of the home, we must take a look at the cost of connection, device type, and privacy.Painless connectivity – “The Experience”When referring to cost, we speak of the ease of connectivity and IoT protocol that is built in and available.As with current digital products, services, and websites, we go through a variety of experiences that range from outstanding to awful. Just recall when you connect to a Bluetooth device, is it intuitive and painless or strenuous and difficult?For mass IoT adoption, connectivity must be painless, quick, and intuitive – Anything different would be ignored and deemed useless.Whether we personally see it beneficial or required, any device that could be connected will end up created (or upgraded) as so. There must be an IoT connectivity standardization as we have with current devices being ‘bluetooth enabled’, ‘wifi available’, built with “Intel inside” or IoT “wireless plug-and-play.”This will be both a technical and logistical issue, as the ability to connect must be a non-issue on its own: either a “Yes” or a “No,” but not a “How.” Just like a good design: don’t make me think.What about devices?From our refrigerator to the stop light, to the office whiteboard, to the scale in the grocery store to…you get the point.What one individual will see as useless, another will see as heaven sent. If individuals will find it useful, heck…connectable, then it will be adopted to the IoT landscape.Users should have the choice of whether to connect or not and the amount of details needed to utilize available features.In addition, it is likely devices will have various grades of intelligence, from simple to super-intelligent. For example, simple lightbulbs are either on or off, where a smart whiteboard would allow enhanced capabilities: image capture, sharing/collaborating, sync and more.The key issue of privacyBack in 2010, Mark Zuckerberg made a few comments how people no longer have an expectation of privacy. Since then, we can notice such a movement, as devices, websites, services, and products are requiring (not requesting) access to more and more personal info.If this will be the case in the near future, privacy selection should be strict and crystal clear, so there won’t be a worry about why or the potential ethical dilemmas.As with devices, I believe there will be a known standard and different preferences you can select between: fully personal, semi-personal, combo, semi-public and fully public.While you have the capability to turn off specific “permissions” in certain apps today, it would be hell to do so for every single app, so a strict yet simple menu of privacy access should be the standard as to maintain ‘painless connectivity’. You should be able to limit the stream of data to know ahead of time which features won’t be available at each privacy level.Take for example virtual personal assistants or Alexa: granting access to your contacts, calendar, email, and social life enables more features, but all such access is not needed at a friend’s house…in that case, you would be able to only join with permissions needed for temporary use.IoT has the potential to grant many capabilities, yet intuitiveness would be a requirement to be picked up beyond the early adopters and have an easy set of rules to abide by, consisting of painless connectivity as well as device and privacy selection.So while the IoT ground rules may vary, what do you think should be the ultimate IoT device you should always carry? Or will there be more than one?Eran Abramson, Head of Marketing, KnowmailThe author is head of marketing at Knowmail, an artificially intelligent inbox assistant for professionals. He is an entrepreneur and creative with vast startup experience as well as mentoring and instructing venture creation and product management.center_img Related Posts Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Follow the Pucklast_img read more

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Fowler has share of lead at OHL Classic

first_imgRead Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:31Go: Search for ‘perfect, honest man’ to lead PNP still on01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 View comments Beterbiev knocks out Koelling in 12th for IBF titlecenter_img Kizzire finished the second round with a 70.The third round will resume early Sunday morning. It is also contingent on the weather, as forecasters are predicting thunderstorms and heavy downpours for the next two days.A total of 79 players made the cut at one-under 141 — but it is not a 54-hole cut, since groups will remain the same over the next two rounds.ADVERTISEMENT PLAYA DEL CARMEN, MEXICO – NOVEMBER 11: Rickie Fowler the United States waves to Zach Johnson of the United States, Jonathan Byrd of the United States and Cameron Tringale of the United States as they look on from a balcony during the continuation of the second round of the OHL Classic at Mayakoba on November 11, 2017 in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. Rob Carr/Getty Images/AFPRickie Fowler, who is playing for the first time since helping the Americans retain the Presidents Cup trophy, has a share of the lead at PGA Tour’s rain-hit OHL Classic at 10-under 132. World number 10 Fowler is tied with Patrick Rodgers and Patton Kizzire, who hasn’t hit a ball since Friday because of thunderstorms which have caused delays over the past two days.ADVERTISEMENT John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Fowler finished three holes early Saturday morning and was then forced to wait out a five-hour rain delay, only to see play at the Playa del Carmen course halted by darkness.After waiting out the weather, Fowler said all he could do was hope for the best on Sunday — which will be a 36-hole finish.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We deal with weather every once in a while on the PGA Tour, around the world, really,” Fowler said. “You kind of just learn to play when you get to play, relax when you get to relax. Rest when you can, tee it up when you can.”Fowler saved par on the 18th hole to record a four-under 67, while Rodgers settled for a 65 after firing his first bogey of the tournament on No. 17.last_img read more

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Virat Kohli enjoys surreal 2017. Can he do it all over again in 2018?

first_imgVirat Kohli has been in a sensational form since the start of 2016 breaking plethora of records and dominated the world batting charts.The Indian cricket captain ended the year as world No.1 in ODIs world No.2 in Tests and world No.3 in Twenty20 Internationals.Kohli has over the years grown in stature and is rated among the best athletes in the world in terms of his work ethics, fitness and heroics on the field — all-in-all, he has become a complete package. He has been India’s poster boy ever since the retirement of the great Sachin Tendulkar in November 2013.The 29-year-old leads his team from the front and has set the benchmark for his teammates to follow. Though it’s tough to maintain the intensity but the Indian skipper has proved that it’s not impossible.The Delhi dasher has been on a record-breaking spree since the start of 2016. 18 centuries, close to 5500 international runs speak volumes about his personality. Kohli also amassed 973 runs including four hundreds in 2016 Indian Premier League.He also became the only batsman to hit double hundreds in four successive Test series during the one-off match against Bangladesh earlier this year. After a lean patch in Test cricket against Australia, Kohli hammered 610 runs in the three-Test series against Sri Lanka at home.Reuters PhotoCurrently, Kohli is the leading run-scorer in ODIs this year with 1460 runs in 26 matches at an average of 76.84 with 6 hundreds and 7 fifties.In the course of a dominant year for India, Kohli also went past Ricky Ponting and is now second in the list of century scorers in ODIs. The Delhi dasher has 32 hundreds and many experts feel he would be able to get close to Sachin Tendulkar’s 49 tons in the format.advertisementKohli now has the most double centuries as a Test captain (6). He joined Sachin Tendulkar and Virender Sehwag at the top of the list for most double centuries by an Indian in Test cricket.Kohli became the only Indian to aggregate over 600 runs in a single Test series for the third time. Sunil Gavaskar and Rahul Dravid had achieved the feat twice.Kohli broke a plethora of records during the Test series against Sri Lanka and became only the second Indian batsman after Vinod Kambli to score two consecutive double hundreds.Kohli also signed off his successful year in style when he tied the knot with Bollywood actor and long-time girlfriend Anushka Sharma on December 11.Today we have promised each other to be bound in love for ever. We are truly blessed to share the news with you.This beautiful day will be made more special with the love and support of our family of fans & well wishers. Thank you for being such an important part of our journey. pic.twitter.com/aobTUwMNAK- Virat Kohli (@imVkohli) December 11, 2017TEAMMATES IN AWERohit Sharma and Kohli have been part of numerous match-winning partnerships in the 50-over format in particular. They like batting together and also do not shy away from praising each other whenever given the opportunity.”His performance has been tremendous since he made his debut. He is the most consistent player in world cricket right now. His work ethic, his discipline is what makes him the way he is. He also works on that aspect of his game,” Rohit told India Today’s Consulting Editor Boria Majumdar.Ajinkya Rahane hailed Kohli’s ability to convert hundreds into double centuries and said the key behind the Indian captain’s staggering run of six double tons in the last two years was his hunger to score more runs even after reaching key milestones.Rahane, India’s vice-captain in Tests, said it was relatively easy to score a hundred but to carry on and play those big knocks needed a different kind of dedication and skill-set which Kohli has in abundance.”What I like about him especially in Test cricket is his conversion of 100s into 200s. I mean his focus level, concentration level after 100 never drops,” Rahane told India Today in an exclusive interview.”He is still hungry, he wants to do well, he wants to contribute towards the team and that’s a great quality he has. You can easily score a 100 and play your shots and throw your wicket (away) but if you see him after scoring a hundred, he actually tightens his game, takes his time again and again wants to convert it into a big one,” he added.Cheteshwar Pujara, who ended the year as second-highest run-getter in Test cricket, said Kohli has the best work ethics in the team.advertisement”He is someone who has the best work ethics in the Indian team and may be across the globe. He is someone who has the best fitness, he is one of the best fielders in the world and when it comes to his batting, I don’t think I need to speak much because the number of runs he has scored, everyone knows,” he told India Today in an exclusive chat.WHAT NEXT?Reuters PhotoAfter outclassing opponents at home in the last 18 months or so, India’s overseas challenge will begin when they take on South Africa in their own backyard in a marathon series. The first Test between the two teams gets underway in Cape Town on January 5.The tour of South Africa will consist of three Tests, six one day internationals and three Twenty20 InternationalsIndia’s last tour was in Australia in 2014-15. Even though India lost the series 2-0, the team under Kohli showed the world that it was capable of winning Test matches away from home.India have not looked back since and have won nine successive Test series and that too with ease.India will also travel to England in June in 2018, a place where Kohli himself endured a torrid time when India last toured in 2014.Kohli’s men will also tour Australia and would hope for their first series victory ever.ALSO WATCH:last_img read more

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a month agoKlopp insists he’s not thinking about Liverpool winning run

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Klopp insists he’s not thinking about Liverpool winning runby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp insists he’s not thinking about their stunning winning run.The Reds’ have now won 15 Premier League matches in a row as they prepare to face Sheffield United at Bramall Lane on Saturday but he insists that is not a factor for them.He said, “We don’t think about it. The only moment when I think about it is in the press conference. Nobody mentions it, we don’t think about it and it’s just about the next game.“Thank God we lost from time to time in the Champions League and other cup competitions so we still know how it feels, because that is really important.“We want to go to Sheffield and make their life as uncomfortable as possible. Maybe we are considered a top team but we don’t want to behave like a top team. Playing, if possible, yes but fighting like a proper challenger.“I don’t see any reason why there should be any advantage for Sheffield apart from playing in their own stadium. Is it allowed that they will fight more than us? No. Is it allowed that they will run more than us? No. Is it allowed that they do more? No.“We have to be spot on. That is the plan. We tried to make sure with how we planned the week that the boys will be ready for the game. Really looking forward to it.” last_img read more

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Wison LNG Distributor Granted AiP by DNV GL

first_imgzoom Wison Offshore & Marine has received an approval in principle (AiP) from classification society DNV GL for its LNG Distributor (LNGD) design. The certificate was awarded at Marintec China 2017 on December 7.This AiP has been granted upon the validation of LNGD design with a specification of 10,000 cubic meter storage capacity, according to Wison.Wison LNGD is a multifunctional LNG distribution vessel, designed to deliver small LNG parcels to multiple locations. It is intended for applications in milk run and regional LNG hub distribution.Launched in April 2017, the LNGD is capable of partial cargo delivery and quick turn-around at the terminal without the need for tug assistance. Its shallow draft design is said to enable better accessibility to waters than conventional LNG carriers.“Our aim is to tap ‘last mile’ demand in global LNG market by facilitating penetration into smaller scale end markets where conventional marine logistics are unable to serve, and our LNGD concept is believed to be a tempting solution for such purpose,” Tangquan Man, Vice President at Wison Offshore & Marine who received the AiP on behalf of the company, said.last_img read more

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Road trip for mens volleyball starts in Romeoville

With four regular season games left before the Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Tournament, the Ohio State men’s volleyball team sits in third place in the eight-team conference, 1.5 games back of first place Lewis University. The league’s regular season champion will be rewarded a bye during the tournament’s quarterfinal round. In 2012, the Buckeyes received the tournament’s lone bye on a tiebreaker after both OSU and Lewis finished the conference campaign with a record of 9-3. The last time the Buckeyes did not have the No. 1 seed was 2006, when they lost in the semifinals as the No. 4 seed against No. 1 seed Loyola of Chicago. Loyola of Chicago sits in second this season, one game behind the Flyers. Finishing at or near the top of the table will be crucial for OSU’s postseason success since tournament matchups are hosted by the higher seed. The Buckeyes have a 10-1 record at home this season, with the lone loss coming in a sweep at the hands of Lewis on March 2. Two of the Buckeyes’ remaining four league matches are on the road against teams of higher standing. OSU cannot afford to drop both matches if it wants to have a shot at earning the automatic berth into the semifinals. Coach Pete Hanson’s squad begins its road trip against Lewis on Thursday night in Romeoville, Ill. OSU senior setter Kyle Lawrence said he and his teammates have not forgotten about the Flyers victory in Columbus earlier this season, and they have been anticipating the rematch ever since. “We have a countdown going on in our locker room to Romeoville, so it’s definitely something we’ve starred on our schedule for the rest of the season. I think we have a little bit of fire under our butts right now after that loss at home,” Lawrence said. Lewis, meanwhile, is looking to regain its composure, coming off two losses in its last three conference matches. Flyers coach Dan Friend said he believes his players have gotten back to the form they had earlier in the season when they won their first eight out of the gate in conference play. “After last weekend, there were a few things we worked on in practice to get us into a better groove,” Friend said. After Thursday night’s contest, the Buckeyes will make the drive to Chicago to face the Ramblers on Saturday. OSU won its previous match against Shane Davis’ men on March 1 in five sets at home. After arguably its toughest week of the regular season, OSU’s schedule becomes much less threatening when it returns home on April 12 to play Quincy on back-to-back nights. The Hawks have only won four sets in league play and have no victories in 10 attempts against conference foes. Like Lewis, OSU is trying to rebound from subpar play as well. The team’s last road trip netted two losses, as the Buckeyes were only able to take two sets combined against the Mastodons of Indiana University Purdue University-Fort Wayne and the Cardinals of Ball State. OSU (17-5, 7-3 MIVA) is currently ranked No. 11 by the American Volleyball Coaches Association. It is the same position the Buckeyes opened the season in before climbing as high as No. 6 in February. The team has not dropped out of the poll’s top 15 all season. OSU senior outside hitter Nick Gibson said this time of year is generally full of exciting games. “We’re looking forward to some good competition, some big matches. It’s going to take a lot. We lost to Lewis here, we’re looking to get a good win there and carry us into the conference tournament,” Gibson said. The Buckeyes’ match against Lewis on Thursday is set to begin at 8 p.m. read more

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Juventus expected Cristiano Ronaldo in low form

first_imgInside information from the Juventus camp talks about the real reason behind Cristiano Ronaldo’s lack of goals during his first ever Serie A season.Yes, it’s already been three matches with Cristiano Ronaldo not scoring any goals on his first ever Serie A season playing for Juventus. But there is a whole reasoning behind all that logic that we all have been wondering about and maybe some of you readers have already figured out by now, the Portuguese forward has a whole plan in motion that will allow him to become an even more important footballer in football history, if that’s even possible… We can already trace the past seasons he’s been playing for Real Madrid in the last nine years to see what he’s been about in regards to his physical condition, there is no denying that Cristiano Ronaldo has gradually changed the way in which he prepares for every single season due to his advanced age for a well-established football player like himself. We tend to forget that under all those muscles and talent to play the beautiful sport, we have a normal human being who has just as many preoccupations as any other person would have.? Check out the full video of today’s ⚪️⚫️ training session only on #JuventusTV ➡️ https://t.co/7FXJsnqlm9#ForzaJuve pic.twitter.com/QNiVuOsldu— JuventusFC (@juventusfcen) September 5, 2018Due to his legendary stature, we might think that Cristiano Ronaldo doesn’t have that same aging process that any other athlete would manifest during his or her career but Ronaldo is flesh and bone just like everybody else. So as time has gone by for a top performance athlete like himself, Cristiano Ronaldo has understood that he needs to modify many of the physical care methods he used growing up as a professional in order to get a better efficiency of every performance. As time went by at Real Madrid, everybody started noticing how Cristiano Ronaldo suddenly stopped doing the same dribbles as he did when he was younger and how his speed diminished in time. The Cristiano Ronaldo we knew during his years as a Red Devils were passed behind him and the man understood that perfectly, he knew that in order to stay in the elite he would have to start looking at new methods that would need to modify many of his traditions as a high-performance athlete.⚽️?? @Cristiano | https://t.co/G9LhZJLa6u ? #CR7JUVE #ForzaJuve pic.twitter.com/1BOTCVXTva— JuventusFC (@juventusfcen) September 8, 2018Zidane’s influence on Ronaldo’s change of heart.At Real Madrid Ronaldo was able to understand that past his 30, he would have to prepare for the rest of the season un a different manner. Cristiano’s performance level difference started to manifest just a year before French manager Zinedine Zidane arrived as the manager of the club, as a proper football legend himself, ‘Zizou’ was able to get through to Ronaldo about his physical care routine and managed to get the very best out of him during his last three seasons at Real Madrid. At Juventus now as the most important transfer in the last decade, Cristiano Ronaldo hasn’t produced the results people expect from him exactly but the Juventus staff knows exactly why this is. Turns out that there is a specific plan to get the very best of Cristiano Ronaldo during the most important stages of the season when the titles are in line. This pretty much exactly as the final years the Portuguese forward had at Real Madrid.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.? Watch the best of Juve’s training during the international break ? featuring a Bucket Challenge! ⚽️?? https://t.co/8iZ5bhkzPZ ⏯ https://t.co/AY2EQaAf82#FinoAllaFine #ForzaJuve pic.twitter.com/fPex2j8ZEZ— JuventusFC (@juventusfcen) September 8, 2018We had the chance to speak directly to one of the staff members at the Italian club who tend to Cristiano Ronaldo every day since he arrived, they speak about the very same program he learned during his time at Real Madrid: “Cristiano Ronaldo himself has taken this type of preparation a step further because he has studied the evolution of his body with the Real Madrid experts and he has learned to adapt his working schedule. As the years have gone by for Cristiano, he has learned to control himself more given that he no longer has the same energy from the first days. He has considered that trying to get in shape from the very start of the season could eventually backfire and even carry some risks due to the whole fatigue probability and injury danger, would increase during the most decisive part of the season in spring. This is the main reason why he has modified his preparation plans for every season a little more lately.” said the source from inside Juventus.A recap of Thursday’s session at JTC ?⚪️⚫️?? https://t.co/aOiAKRp5X5?? https://t.co/HCfOFBrCRA #FinoAllaFine #ForzaJuve pic.twitter.com/OkwCkW09i7— JuventusFC (@juventusfcen) September 6, 2018How long will Cristiano Ronaldo take to get to his best form in Serie A? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more

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