QPR 3-0 Bournemouth: Highlights of Rangers’ resounding victory

first_imgQPR moved up to second in the Championship, level on points with leaders Leicester, with a resounding 3-0 win over Bournemouth at Loftus Road. It was an emphatic response by Rangers to Saturday’s surprise defeat at Doncaster.See also:Phillips’ goal caps resounding QPR victory’It’s good to be back’ says fit-again CarrollDelighted Rangers chairman Fernandes savours biggest victoryQPR v Bournemouth player ratings 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

Should Darwin Get a Pass in Science Class?

first_imgIn many public school science classrooms today, Darwinism is taught uncritically as a scientific fact.  Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education (NCSE) defends that practice, and Casey Luskin of the Discovery Institute (DI) contests it.  This month the two in their own venues argued their points of view, and another educator weighed in on a larger issue about science education.    In Nature,1 Scott wrote a book review of How Science Works: Evolution. A Student Primer by R. John Ellis (Springer, 2010).  The phrase “How science works” is often one of her own catch-phrases, so it would seem she would warm up to this pro-Darwin book, but she had some criticisms.  “The public misunderstands and mistrusts the scientific explanation of evolution more than any other branch of research, particularly in the United States,” she began.  She thought Ellis did a pretty good job explaining how science works: “Students learn about testing multiple hypotheses, reliance on natural causes, the open-endedness of science, its lack of dogmatism and the function of peer review and replicating results.”  But she got a little nervous when he went overboard on his naturalism: “He contrasts naturalism – the ideology that only the physical universe exists, operating “according to inbuilt, unvarying regularities” – with supernaturalism, the view that non-physical “active agents” interact with the physical world.  Religion, “the belief in some superhuman controlling power or powers”, is a subset of the latter, he writes.  Ellis distinguishes between the methodological and philosophical aspects of naturalism, but regularly conflates it with science, which is not an ideology.Scott also had problems with his “uneven” definitions of evolution.  She thinks he gave short shrift to common ancestry.  He defined evolution as “change in genetic composition of populations with time,” hardly a phrase pregnant with images of bacteria to man.  She thought his definition of homology also left the reader with the “wrong impression that homology is merely anatomical similarity.”  This book review, therefore, shows Scott’s views remain the same as when she debated Phillip Johnson in the 1980s: Science is not an ideology, the rules of science require methodological naturalism, the only methodologically naturalistic view of biology available is Darwinian evolution, because it does not involve supernaturalism, therefore we must teach Darwin in the schools and keep out creationism and intelligent design.  Scott’s last paragraph says all the reader needs to know about her views, by the company she prefers.  “It is welcome when scientists explain evolution to the public.  But for a better introduction to the topic I would recommend Jerry Coyne’s Why Evolution is True (Viking, 2009), Richard Dawkins’s The Greatest Show on Earth (Free Press, 2009), Donald Prothero’s Evolution (Columbia University Press, 2007) and Neil Shubin’s Your Inner Fish (Pantheon, 2008).”    Casey Luskin begs to differ.  Students benefit from hearing Darwinism taught scientifically, he said (i.e., with critical thinking), and he wrote a new paper to support it.  The paper, based on a presentation he gave last fall at the University of St. Thomas, has been published in the university’s Journal of Law & Public Policy,2  The paper made three points summarized by Luskin on Evolution News & Views:The inquiry method of teaching science stresses process over content.There are no legal obstacles to teaching scientific critiques of prevailing theories.There is ample evidence of controversy in evolutionary literature.The full paper can be downloaded as a PDF file from the Discovery Institute website.    Luskin got support for his thesis from an unexpected source – Science magazine, usually a staunchly pro-Darwin, pro-NCSE source.  Last month, Jonathan Osborne (School of Education, Stanford University) wrote a review article entitled, “Arguing to Learn in Science: The Role of Collaborative, Critical Discourse,”3 in which he said basically the same thing: students benefit by learning the process of debate about controversial subjects – including evolution.Argument and debate are common in science, yet they are virtually absent from science education.  Recent research shows, however, that opportunities for students to engage in collaborative discourse and argumentation offer a means of enhancing student conceptual understanding and students’ skills and capabilities with scientific reasoning.  As one of the hallmarks of the scientist is critical, rational skepticism, the lack of opportunities to develop the ability to reason and argue scientifically would appear to be a significant weakness in contemporary educational practice.  In short, knowing what is wrong matters as much as knowing what is right.  This paper presents a summary of the main features of this body of research and discusses its implications for the teaching and learning of science.Osborne goes on to say that argumentation is not peripheral to the practice of science, but “core to its practice, and without argument and evaluation, the construction of reliable knowledge would be impossible.”  In education, however, scientific explanations are given with the presumption that they are true.  Students are not being given the opportunity to experience how claims are supported by evidence, warrants, and qualifiers, and subjected to counter-claims, rebuttals and counter-arguments.  “Consequently, science can appear to its students as a monolith of facts, an authoritative discourse where the discursive exploration of ideas, their implications, and their importance is absent,” Osborne lamented.  “Students then emerge with na�ve ideas or misconceptions about the nature of science itself,” even though the AAAS and National Research Council endorse the value of argumentation in learning science.    This is all fine and good, but surely Osborne is not referring to evolution, is he?  Aren’t all educators and scientists insistent that evolution is a scientific fact, about which there is no reason to argue?The study of reasoning also offers an opportunity to explore the types of arguments used in science, which may be abductive (inferences to the best possible explanation), such as Darwin’s arguments for the theory of evolution; hypothetico-deductive, such as Pasteur’s predictions about the outcome of the first test of his anthrax vaccine; or simply inductive generalizations archetypal represented by “laws.”Osborne pointed out that students find classroom teaching that emphasizes argumentation skills much more engaging, too.  He ended by arguing that science education cannot be separated from matters of epistemology: “research has demonstrated that teaching students to reason, argue, and think critically will enhance students’ conceptual learning.  This will only happen, however, if students are provided structured opportunities to engage in deliberative exploration of ideas, evidence, and argument—in short, how we know what we know, why it matters, and how it came to be.”1.  Eugenie Scott, “Back to basics by way of evolution,” Nature Volume: 465, 164, 13 May 2010, doi:10.1038/465164a.2.  Casey Luskin, “The Constitutional and Pedagogical Benefits of Teaching Evolution Scientifically,” University of St.  Thomas Journal of Law & Public Policy, Vol. IV(1):204-277 (Fall, 2009).3.  Jonathan Osborne, “Arguing to Learn in Science: The Role of Collaborative, Critical Discourse,” Science23 April 2010: Vol. 328. no. 5977, pp. 463 – 466, DOI: 10.1126/science.1183944.The problem with Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education is that she never received a good science education.  She got a defective education from the triumphalist Julian Huxley era when logical positivism was in swing and Darwinism was presented as a done deal.  That was before Quine and Kuhn and Feyerabend upset all the applecarts; Lakatos, Laudan, van Fraasen and many others undermined everything we thought we understood about “how science works.”  Even Osborne’s short list begs many questions about scientific reasoning – i.e., what is meant by a law of nature?  Scott is living in the 1940s and needs a refresher course in how science works.  She needs to learn about abductive reasoning (used extensively by Stephen Meyer in Signature in the Cell).  She also needs a refresher course in logic so that she does not make self-refuting statements, like stating the ideology that methodological naturalism is not an ideology, or claiming that science cannot refer to the supernatural, but then employing reason to make that claim, when reason is not made of particles or forces, and refers to logical truths that are universal, timeless, necessary and certain.    Eugenie Scott needs to go take classes in Philosophy of Science and Elementary Logic, particularly in how not to be inconsistent.  Her definition of science includes testing multiple hypotheses, as long as the hypothesis selection process can exclude ones she doesn’t like.  Her science is fine with natural causes, as long as she can dip into the supernatural causes she needs, like logic and reason.  Her science is open-ended, as long as she can close off the ends she doesn’t like.  Her science lacks dogmatism, as long as she can be dogmatic about the parts she wants to be dogmatic about.  Her science is fine with peer review, as long as the pool of peers is protected against the peers she doesn’t like.  Her science is fine with replicating results, as long as she doesn’t have to replicate the parts she can’t, like universal common descent.  Her science believes in following the rules of “how science works,” as long as she and her totalitarian Darwin Party hacks get to make the rules.  Is this the kind of shallow, uninformed, na�ve, partisan, illogical thinking that should be representing science education at school boards?  Do a good deed for your country: send the NCSE back to school.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More →

Football boots for all

first_imgThe campaign’s ambassadors LindaButhelezi and Andre Arendse witha Nedbank employee. Linda Buthelezi signing a Nedbank employeemakarapa. Nedbank employees are major benefactorsof the football boots campaign.(Images: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Carol CrawfordMarketing & Communications ManagerThe Sports Trust+27 11 802 [email protected] NkosiSouth African NGO Sports Trust is well on its way to collect 20 000 pairs of football boots for disadvantaged kids across the country, having so far raised R285 000 (US$3 810) – enough to buy 1 553 pairs.The Sports Trust Soccer Boots Drive, launched in Johannesburg’s Alexandra township in August 2009, will distribute the 20 000 pairs of boots to aspirant footballers at schools in the country’s disadvantaged areas.“It’s the poor residential nodes that we looking at,” said Carol Crawford, the NGO’s marketing and communications manager. “We aim to give back to underprivileged children countrywide.”At the 2009 launch, Kick 4 Change donated 250 pairs of boots to children living in Alexandra.  The campaign encourages the public to either donate a pair of new or old useable boots or an amount of R140 ($18.75) to buy a new pair.Sports Trust has teamed up with a number of businesses and NGOs to raise the funds. Boots can also be dropped off at these partners’ premises, such as Nedbank, FedEx, Sportsman’s Warehouse, KickOff magazine and Safe Hands Soccer.Former Bafana Bafana stalwarts Linda Buthelezi and Andre Arendse are the campaign’s ambassadors. Radio 2000, an SABC station, is a broadcast partner and has been highlighting the campaign, and urging its listeners to contribute.“Wherever we take the campaign, Radio 2000 is there to spread the message,” said Dida Malulyck, Sports Trust’s project manager.Commercial partners are encouraging their employees to donate. Nedbank, one of South Africa’s four big banks, hosted a beneficial event at its Sandton branch on 7 May. The achieved aim was to accumulate funds from donations and trading of the campaign’s merchandise.Nedbank’s nationwide branches are also involved in indentifying schools that will benefit. “Nedbank will help us reach the poor areas that we need to benefit,” said Buthelezi.Crawford says the impetus for the Sports Trust Soccer Boots Drive came from South Africa hosting the 2010 Fifa World Cup. “With the World Cup coming, we decided to have a big campaign,” she said.Developing young talentCampaign ambassador Buthelezi strongly remembers getting his first pair of football boots. Andries Mpondo, a former Moroka Swallows top-rated player, bought him the pair when Buthelezi was a 16-year-old amateur playing in Soweto’s Meadowlands township.“I got my boots when I was 16 years old and it changed my ability to play,” Buthelezi said. “From there I increased my skills.”He went on play for local top teams such as Kaizer Chiefs as well as overseas, and was in the Bafana Bafana squad – South Africa’s national team – that won the 1996 Africa Cup of Nations.Affectionately known as Mercedes Benz, Buthelezi emphasised the importance of a good pair of boots in developing football skills. “If you don’t have resources you are bound to take time to succeed,” he said. “The campaign is a good cause and we need support to reach most areas.”last_img read more

Read More →

The True Cost of Electricity

first_imgUpstream operationsUpstream operations take place before electricity is generated. For fossil-fuel and nuclear generators, the largest upstream external costs are associated with producing, processing, and transporting fuel. For solar and wind, the main upstream impacts are associated with manufacturing and transporting materials required for the solar panels and wind turbines. The price we all pay for electricity generally does not reflect the “true costs” of producing it. As described in a recent blog post, generating electricity creates harmful pollution, damaging the environment and public health. This comes with a cost, but it is not necessarily paid for by those generating the pollution or purchasing the electricity. These types of costs are known as “external costs.”For example, a coal-fired power plant releases pollution into the atmosphere, which adversely affects the health of residents in nearby communities. This pollution is an example of an external cost because it causes health problems that neither the plant owners nor the electric users pay for (unless they live near the plant and pay the cost through their health bills).From coal mining and energy production, to distributing and using that energy, to disposing of waste products, electricity has many external costs. By examining them, we can better understand the true cost of electricity and how it varies depending on the technology or fuel used to generate it. The external costs associated with upstream operations can be significant. Natural gas, for example, burns cleaner than other fossil fuels such as coal. However, methane, the primary component of natural gas, is a very potent greenhouse gas – up to 84 times more powerful than carbon dioxide in the first 20 years it is released into the atmosphere. Leaks and intentional releases of this damaging pollutant during the production, delivery, and use of natural gas, if not addressed, have the potential to negate the environmental benefits of natural gas over coal.The potential dangers of methane from natural gas operations can be most starkly seen in the recent, massive methane leak at a natural gas storage facility in Aliso Canyon, California. After a well in the facility failed, it leaked a total of 97,000 metric tons of methane before the gas company was able to plug the leak. This is the short term climate equivalent of burning almost a billion gallons of gasoline. RELATED ARTICLES Climate impactsIn addition to the types of pollution described above, fossil-fuel power plants also release greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere – the main culprit of climate change. The carbon intensity of electricity generation varies significantly by fuel and technology, with coal and oil generation producing the most carbon and certain renewable energy, like solar and wind, producing none. However, as mentioned earlier, these renewables do produce carbon in upstream operations. The graph (above) shows the total lifecycle carbon emissions for each technology, including upstream and downstream emissions.A coal-fired plant emits about one ton of carbon for each 1,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity it generates over its lifecycle. In 2013, the U.S. government updated its estimate of the cost to society of each ton of carbon emitted (also known as the “social cost of carbon”) and valued it at approximately $40 per ton. Based on that estimate, the climate-related damages from coal plants equal 4 cents per kilowatt-hour on average. However, $40 per ton is an underestimate because not all climate damages are considered in this figure.Overall, the electric power sector contributes significantly to the nation’s carbon emissions – equaling almost 40% of total U.S. emissions in 2015. Based on the social cost of carbon, climate-related damages from the power sector were nearly $80 billion in a single year. That cost is mostly borne by current and future generations through increased frequency of extreme weather events like flooding, drought, storms, and so on. Downstream operationsDownstream operations take place during the generation of electricity and its subsequent transmission and distribution to customers. Downstream operations potentially affect health, climate, and water.Pollution from fossil-fuel power plants makes up a significant portion of the downstream external costs associated with electricity generation. The U.S. Clean Air Act regulates and limits the amount of common pollutants power plants can release, including particulate matter (PM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Emissions of SO2 and NOx also are regulated under various cap-and-trade programs. While these programs have substantially reduced SO2 and NOx pollution, the remaining emissions from fossil-fuel generators still have adverse health impacts, including premature death and asthma.A National Research Council study in 2005, for example, found these health-impacting pollutants from coal- and gas-fired power plants, respectively, cost society 3.2 cents and 0.16 cents per unit of generated electricity (kilowatt-hour). With an average household in the United States using about 11,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity each year, the health cost associated with that electricity consumption would be about $350 per year if it all came from a coal plant.center_img Transforming the Electric SystemSolar Energy Can Make the Grid More ResilientWhen Will Rooftop Solar Be Cheaper Than the Grid?New York Utility Finds Big Payoff in New IdeasRethinking the GridThe Cheapest Way to Scale Up Renewable Energy?An Introduction to Photovoltaic Systems Ferit Ucar is a senior clean energy economist with the Environmental Defense Fund. This post originally was published on April 28. Water ImpactsCertain power plants need large amounts of water to operate, reducing water quality and intensifying drought in some areas. These plants occasionally release chemical pollutants into nearby lakes or rivers. Even when these instances are limited and regulated, there are still occasional, accidental releases like the 2014 Dan River coal ash spill in North Carolina. Importantly, solar and wind require no water to produce electricity, making them a less costly choice in terms of water impacts.So what should we do with these external costs now that we know more about them? Incorporating the health and environmental costs of electricity into the price we pay for it is one solution for which Environmental Defense Fund is advocating. Doing so will help reduce pollution and ensure a level playing field for clean energy in our electricity markets, creating a cleaner system for everyone. This is the second of a four-part series that takes a deep dive into the economics of our electric system and the role pricing can play in accelerating the clean energy economy. The first article in the series was Transforming the Electric System.last_img read more

Read More →

Why You Didn’t Succeed Today

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now You’re worried about lead generation when you should be worried about pursuing strategic targets, your dream clients, the ones who would value tremendously from what you sell.You’re concerned about what marketing is doing when what should command your attention is what you need to do to create and win new opportunities.You spend your time distracted by US politics instead of focused on the few things that actually improve your results, like your task list and your effort.The priorities of other people that were delivered to your email inbox received more of your attention today than your priorities, a recipe for missing your goals.The snooze button on your alarm clock took 27 minutes from you this morning and that was more time you spent prospecting. You chose comfort over success.If you know more about Khloe and her life than what’s going on with the contacts in your dream clients, you are not likely to displace your competitor any time soon.Win customers away from your competition. Check out Eat Their LunchSome of the people around you infect you with their small thinking and their cynicism because you aren’t breathing fire and taking the massive action that would infect them with your mindset—or drive them away from you.You’re waiting for someone to motivate you when real motivation only comes from wanting something enough that you start chasing it the minute your feet hit the floor.You’re afraid of calling and interrupting your dream client because some so-called “social guru” on LinkedIn told you that makes you Blake from Glenn Ross, when you should be afraid of your competitor doing exactly what you are afraid to do.Fear. Excuses. Distractions. Things that feel like work but are not work. If you want to success, you have to avoid all the things on this list.last_img read more

Read More →

FIFA World Cup 2014: Five key players from South Korea

first_imgSon Heung-Min and Ki Sung-Yeung will be crucial for South Korea at the World CupWith plenty of European-based talent, South Korea has players with top-level experience and the quality to makes things happen on the field.Chief among them may be Son Heung-Min, a Bayer Leverkusen forward who can change games with his pace and shooting.Other standouts include Sunderland playmaker Ki Sung-Yeung and Kim Young-Kwon, a 24-year-old defender who is likely to be South Korea’s next big export to Europe.Here are five players to watch:SON HEUNG-MINPotentially South Korea’s game changer, forward Son Heung-Min is ready to prove himself at the World Cup after making his name in the Bundesliga.Transferred to Bayer Leverkusen last July for $14 million after three seasons at Hamburg, the 21-year-old Son has not been consistently excellent for his new team but when he has played well, he’s played very well.Son is a striker who likes to use his pace to sprint past defenders from deep and then shoot from distance. He tends to score in streaks. And if he can get into groove in Brazil, South Korea will possess a powerful weapon.Not always used well in the past for the national team, Son has started to find his form under coach Hong Myong-bo.KI SUNG-YEUNGSunderland playmaker Ki Sung-Yeung controls the tempo of the South Korean team, and after an impressive season for his club he is now regarded as one of the best passers in the Premier League.Still only 25 but with 56 international appearances, Ki is approaching his peak and rarely gives the ball away.The issue for South Korea coach Hong Myong-Bo is whether to keep Ki deep, where he is a valuable outlet for defenders, or push him up the field where his passing can unlock backlines.KIM YOUNG-KWONMarcello Lippi declared in 2013 that central defender Kim Young-Kwon was good enough to play for Manchester United, one of the highest compliments that could be paid to a young Asian prospect.Kim has been a star since joining Chinese team Guangzhou Evergrande in 2012, helping them to the 2013 Asian Champions League title.Physically strong, good in the air and on the ground, the 24-year-old Kim occasionally is caught napping but is improving all the time and expected to be playing in Europe very soon.JUNG SUNG-RYUNGThe goalkeeping position is a worry for South Korea coach Hong Myong-Bo, but 2010 custodian Jung Sung-Ryung is likely to start ahead of Kim Seung-Gyu.Much depends on how Jung turns up.The ‘keeper during Seongnam’s run to the 2010 Asian Champions League title seemed unbeatable, but any repeat of the clumsy performances of the second half of the 2013 K-League season could result in South Korea heading home early.PARK CHU-YOUNGArsenal striker Park Chu-Young has only played seven minutes in the Premier League since joining the Gunners in August 2011 and is now on loan to second-division club Watford as he bids to stay in shape.Inactivity at Arsenal cost Park his international place, but before the move to London he was one of Asia’s top strikers.Now back in the team, Park scored from a fierce half-volley against Greece in March.Clever and technically excellent, Park leads the line well and links up with the team’s talented attackers.last_img read more

Read More →

23 days agoBVB chief Watzke mocks Aubameyang: Enjoy your money

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say BVB chief Watzke mocks Aubameyang: Enjoy your moneyby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveHans-Joachim Watzke, the managing director of Borussia Dortmund, has taken a swipe at Arsenal striker Pierre Emerick Aubameyang.Watzke admits the Gabon international did not leave positive memories in Dortmund.He recalled to Suddeustche Zeitung, “I think that Aubameyang is happy at Arsenal, especially when he looks at his bank account.”On Wednesdays, however, he must sit in front of his television to watch the Champions League.”Having quit BVB in January 2018, Aubameyang hasn’t tasted Champions League football with the Gunners. last_img

Read More →

18 days agoTottenham confirm Lloris out until 2020

first_imgTottenham confirm Lloris out until 2020by Freddie Taylor18 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham have confirmed Hugo Lloris will miss the rest of 2019.The French goalkeeper dislocated his elbow in a freak incident against Brighton on Saturday.In a statement, Tottenham said: “Hugo Lloris has undergone further assessment this morning after sustaining a dislocated elbow in our match against Brighton on Saturday.”The findings have shown that although surgery will not be required, our Club Captain has suffered ligament damage and is not expected to return to training before the end of 2019.”Hugo is currently in a brace and will now undergo a period of rest and rehabilitation under the supervision of our medical staff at Hotspur Way.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

Countdown To A Cure amfAR Wants You To Sing Thats What Friends

first_imgIn honor of the 40 million lives lost and the countless lives impacted by HIV/AIDS, amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, is reigniting the fight to end the epidemic with a rally cry.amfAR is asking the world to contribute to the cure by singing and uploading brief covers of the song “That’s What Friends Are For” on social media using the hashtag: #SingForAIDS.This December marks 30 years since the epidemic began and 30 years since the song topped Billboard’s charts at #1. Originally performed by Dionne Warwick, Stevie Wonder, Elton John and Gladys Knight, the song exemplifies the importance of friendships and support from loved ones when going through personal moments and milestones. amfAR could not have achieved the milestones in this battle without its friends.amfAR’s Countdown to a Cure for AIDS is a research initiative aimed at developing the scientific basis for a cure by 2020. Launched in February 2014, the Countdown is designed to intensify amfAR’s cure-focused HIV research program through strategic investments of $100 million over the next five years.Until December 1st, amfAR’s celebrities and supporters will be participating in the #SingForAIDS social campaign. Find out more on the Countdown to a Cure website.last_img read more

Read More →