Avangrid Begins Surveys Offshore North Carolina

first_imgAvangrid Renewables is conducting geophysical surveys at the Kitty Hawk offshore wind lease area off the coast of North Carolina, U.S.The work is being carried out in and near the wind lease area and proposed cable corridor from Sandbridge, Virginia, to the east of Corolla, North Carolina.The purpose of the surveys, scheduled for the period from 25 June to 15 October, is to characterize seabed/sub-surface conditions for the project.Surveys include multibeam bathymetry, magnetic measurements, side scan sonar imaging, seabed stratigraphy, benthic sediment sampling and video imaging, Avangrid said.Offshore survey vessel M/V Gerry Bordelon and nearshore survey vessel Theory, operated by TerraSond, are in charge of executing the work.Additionally, NOAA Fisheries issued an incidental harassment authorization (IHA) to Avangrid Renewables to take small numbers of marine mammals incidental to the geophysical survey investigations associated with marine site characterization activities in the lease area.To remind, Avangrid secured the rights to develop the 122,405-acre lease area in May 2017. It has a potential generating capacity of 1,486MW and is the first offshore wind lease area to be secured off North Carolina.last_img read more

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Why Kevin Durant spurning the Lakers is good for L.A.

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error This is a mistake. The Lakers need to see the snubbing as the gift it is and forge a new path.By eliminating the Lakers before free agency began, Durant saved the franchise the anxiety — as well as the practical and financial challenges — of waiting and hoping.Fans remember that game. It’s the same strategy employed in each of the past three summers when the Lakers spent their time pursuing Dwight Howard, Carmelo Anthony and LaMarcus Aldridge. By the time they had been spurned and were ready to move on, only slim pickings remained on the free-agency vine.These early July days are valuable for teams to implement their vision. With a young core established and a new coach in the fold, the Lakers finally seem to have something on which to build.Three consecutive losing seasons have set up the Lakers for a turnaround, but not the instant gratification they have experienced in acquiring past stars like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Shaquille O’Neal and Pau Gasol.The condition of the Lakers dictates this turnaround be more gradual.Last week, the Lakers used the second overall pick to draft Brandon Ingram, a highly skilled, but physically developing, small forward from Duke.He, like new teammates D’Angelo Russell, Julius Randle and Jordan Clarkson, needs to grow into his role.The Lakers want to give him that opportunity. And acquiring a win-now megastar the likes of Durant would only undercut that effort.Executive vice president Jim Buss still faces his self-imposed deadline to turn around the team by the end of next season. Whether it’s a sign of acceptance of his fate, or an attempt to buy himself more time with a change of course, Buss and General Manager Mitch Kupchak appear ready to embrace development.Listen to what Kupchak had to say following the draft, and it’s clear the Lakers’ mindset has changed from recent seasons.“As long as the team is fun to watch, our fans and our partners can see a team that’s growing and getting better as the season goes along, I think that’s the barometer that’s best for us,” Kupchak said.There was merely an oblique reference to the playoffs. Making the postseason was not listed as a priority.Translation: Please don’t judge us on wins and losses.It’s a plea executives of other, less glamorous franchises have made to their fans in recent years. Pride, and a need to satiate Kobe Bryant in his final years, made it difficult for the Lakers to be so honest before now.None of this is to say the Lakers will not swing for the fences. Miami’s Hassan Whiteside and Golden State’s Harrison Barnes will command maximum salary offers, and Kupchak said the Lakers would aggressively pursue veterans who can play big roles for a young team.The Lakers have more space for big-time free agents, not only under the salary cap but on the roster and in the locker room.“We didn’t have as much to sell last year and the year before,” Kupchak said, “and we only had enough money for one player last year, too. This year, I think we have more to sell.”There will be buyers out there. Durant was just never going to be among them.He saw what the Lakers have finally begun to acknowledge. This will be an incremental rebuild.So go knock the socks off Whiteside with a maximum offer. Sign Barnes to an offer sheet and see what happens. Add some veterans.Just don’t spend the first week of July chasing Durant.Unless it’s to thank him. The answer is, of course, that the Lakers, who will have more than $65 million in cap space, would have been very interested. If only Durant returned the affection.Like Charlie Brown said, “Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love.”• PREVIEW: How will the Lakers fare in free agency?While NBA people will tell you it’s always better to get a meeting with a free agent and be able to sell your vision, chasing Durant was destined to be a futile exercise for the Lakers, who won 17 games last season.The challenge for the Lakers will be accepting this fate, understanding that a series of offseason blunders have brought them to this point, and not devote their energy to a futile chase of Durant. An ESPN report Tuesday said the Lakers are still trying to wedge their way into the Durant sweepstakes.center_img How can the Lakers make it up to Kevin Durant? A few uncontested 3-point attempts the next time his team — whichever one that is — comes to town? Dinner out at one of L.A.’s five-star restaurants? A date with a Kardashian?Believe it or not, Durant just might have done the Lakers a favor by reportedly leaving them off the list of six teams he will meet with when NBA free agents can begin negotiating late Thursday night.Wait, what?Durant, 27, is the top free agent available and a former league Most Valuable Player who came oh-so-close to leading his underdog Oklahoma City Thunder to the NBA Finals last month. He has averaged at least 25 points a game for eight consecutive seasons, since his second year in the league. He is a quality teammate and active in his community. Why wouldn’t the Lakers be interested?last_img read more

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Local Elections 2019: John O’Donnell set to top the poll in Milford

first_imgKilmacrennan-based Councillor John O’Donnell looks set to top the poll in the Milford area.Independent Councillor O’Donnell said recently that ‘the electorate of the Milford area will be the judges of my record on May 24th – and tally figures indicate that he’s set to lead the way.O’Donnell has taken 24 per cent of the vote, with over 1,600 first preferences – with boxes in Kilmacrennan and Termon, his strongholds, still to be tallied. Fianna Fáil’s Liam Blaney is set to be comfortably returned to Lifford. Blaney has over 1,533 first preferences and there seems an intriguing battle set to develop for the last seat in the new three-seat area.Sitting Independent Councillor Ian McGarvey appears to be in a race with Fine Gael’s Eimer Friel and Sinn Féin’s Maria Doherty.Follow our LIVE Blog on the 2019 Donegal Local Elections via the link below LIVE: Donegal Daily Local Elections 2019 – follow our updatesLocal Elections 2019: John O’Donnell set to top the poll in Milford was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:2019 local electionsDonegal County CouncilJohn O’Donnellkilmacrennanlast_img read more

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Say again: Top 49ers quotes as rookie minicamp starts

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Thursday’s arrival of the 49ers rookie class brought with it clever quotes to the media heading into practices Friday and Saturday. Here are the top soundbites:Linebacker Dre Greenlaw (fifth round):On rescuing a drugged coed from a fraternity party:“When she told me that first time, it really didn’t click, but she said she needed help, and I saw a dude was grabbing at her, so I felt I needed to step in. I did that and I’m thankful it stopped when it did, and that I took …last_img

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The Deets: The real meaning of 49ers-Ravens

first_img“There’s no best team in football right now. They decide that in February.”No question, the … Lucky us, we’re getting a highly possible Super Bowl preview on the first day of December.The Ravens and Lamar Jackson look unstoppable. The 49ers have been dominating. Sunday, they meet in Baltimore.It’s easy to go overboard with the hype for this game — unstoppable force vs. the immovable object and all that jazz.But I liked what Ravens coach John Harbaugh said about the contest Tuesday:last_img

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Should Darwin Get a Pass in Science Class?

first_imgIn many public school science classrooms today, Darwinism is taught uncritically as a scientific fact.  Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education (NCSE) defends that practice, and Casey Luskin of the Discovery Institute (DI) contests it.  This month the two in their own venues argued their points of view, and another educator weighed in on a larger issue about science education.    In Nature,1 Scott wrote a book review of How Science Works: Evolution. A Student Primer by R. John Ellis (Springer, 2010).  The phrase “How science works” is often one of her own catch-phrases, so it would seem she would warm up to this pro-Darwin book, but she had some criticisms.  “The public misunderstands and mistrusts the scientific explanation of evolution more than any other branch of research, particularly in the United States,” she began.  She thought Ellis did a pretty good job explaining how science works: “Students learn about testing multiple hypotheses, reliance on natural causes, the open-endedness of science, its lack of dogmatism and the function of peer review and replicating results.”  But she got a little nervous when he went overboard on his naturalism: “He contrasts naturalism – the ideology that only the physical universe exists, operating “according to inbuilt, unvarying regularities” – with supernaturalism, the view that non-physical “active agents” interact with the physical world.  Religion, “the belief in some superhuman controlling power or powers”, is a subset of the latter, he writes.  Ellis distinguishes between the methodological and philosophical aspects of naturalism, but regularly conflates it with science, which is not an ideology.Scott also had problems with his “uneven” definitions of evolution.  She thinks he gave short shrift to common ancestry.  He defined evolution as “change in genetic composition of populations with time,” hardly a phrase pregnant with images of bacteria to man.  She thought his definition of homology also left the reader with the “wrong impression that homology is merely anatomical similarity.”  This book review, therefore, shows Scott’s views remain the same as when she debated Phillip Johnson in the 1980s: Science is not an ideology, the rules of science require methodological naturalism, the only methodologically naturalistic view of biology available is Darwinian evolution, because it does not involve supernaturalism, therefore we must teach Darwin in the schools and keep out creationism and intelligent design.  Scott’s last paragraph says all the reader needs to know about her views, by the company she prefers.  “It is welcome when scientists explain evolution to the public.  But for a better introduction to the topic I would recommend Jerry Coyne’s Why Evolution is True (Viking, 2009), Richard Dawkins’s The Greatest Show on Earth (Free Press, 2009), Donald Prothero’s Evolution (Columbia University Press, 2007) and Neil Shubin’s Your Inner Fish (Pantheon, 2008).”    Casey Luskin begs to differ.  Students benefit from hearing Darwinism taught scientifically, he said (i.e., with critical thinking), and he wrote a new paper to support it.  The paper, based on a presentation he gave last fall at the University of St. Thomas, has been published in the university’s Journal of Law & Public Policy,2  The paper made three points summarized by Luskin on Evolution News & Views:The inquiry method of teaching science stresses process over content.There are no legal obstacles to teaching scientific critiques of prevailing theories.There is ample evidence of controversy in evolutionary literature.The full paper can be downloaded as a PDF file from the Discovery Institute website.    Luskin got support for his thesis from an unexpected source – Science magazine, usually a staunchly pro-Darwin, pro-NCSE source.  Last month, Jonathan Osborne (School of Education, Stanford University) wrote a review article entitled, “Arguing to Learn in Science: The Role of Collaborative, Critical Discourse,”3 in which he said basically the same thing: students benefit by learning the process of debate about controversial subjects – including evolution.Argument and debate are common in science, yet they are virtually absent from science education.  Recent research shows, however, that opportunities for students to engage in collaborative discourse and argumentation offer a means of enhancing student conceptual understanding and students’ skills and capabilities with scientific reasoning.  As one of the hallmarks of the scientist is critical, rational skepticism, the lack of opportunities to develop the ability to reason and argue scientifically would appear to be a significant weakness in contemporary educational practice.  In short, knowing what is wrong matters as much as knowing what is right.  This paper presents a summary of the main features of this body of research and discusses its implications for the teaching and learning of science.Osborne goes on to say that argumentation is not peripheral to the practice of science, but “core to its practice, and without argument and evaluation, the construction of reliable knowledge would be impossible.”  In education, however, scientific explanations are given with the presumption that they are true.  Students are not being given the opportunity to experience how claims are supported by evidence, warrants, and qualifiers, and subjected to counter-claims, rebuttals and counter-arguments.  “Consequently, science can appear to its students as a monolith of facts, an authoritative discourse where the discursive exploration of ideas, their implications, and their importance is absent,” Osborne lamented.  “Students then emerge with na�ve ideas or misconceptions about the nature of science itself,” even though the AAAS and National Research Council endorse the value of argumentation in learning science.    This is all fine and good, but surely Osborne is not referring to evolution, is he?  Aren’t all educators and scientists insistent that evolution is a scientific fact, about which there is no reason to argue?The study of reasoning also offers an opportunity to explore the types of arguments used in science, which may be abductive (inferences to the best possible explanation), such as Darwin’s arguments for the theory of evolution; hypothetico-deductive, such as Pasteur’s predictions about the outcome of the first test of his anthrax vaccine; or simply inductive generalizations archetypal represented by “laws.”Osborne pointed out that students find classroom teaching that emphasizes argumentation skills much more engaging, too.  He ended by arguing that science education cannot be separated from matters of epistemology: “research has demonstrated that teaching students to reason, argue, and think critically will enhance students’ conceptual learning.  This will only happen, however, if students are provided structured opportunities to engage in deliberative exploration of ideas, evidence, and argument—in short, how we know what we know, why it matters, and how it came to be.”1.  Eugenie Scott, “Back to basics by way of evolution,” Nature Volume: 465, 164, 13 May 2010, doi:10.1038/465164a.2.  Casey Luskin, “The Constitutional and Pedagogical Benefits of Teaching Evolution Scientifically,” University of St.  Thomas Journal of Law & Public Policy, Vol. IV(1):204-277 (Fall, 2009).3.  Jonathan Osborne, “Arguing to Learn in Science: The Role of Collaborative, Critical Discourse,” Science23 April 2010: Vol. 328. no. 5977, pp. 463 – 466, DOI: 10.1126/science.1183944.The problem with Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education is that she never received a good science education.  She got a defective education from the triumphalist Julian Huxley era when logical positivism was in swing and Darwinism was presented as a done deal.  That was before Quine and Kuhn and Feyerabend upset all the applecarts; Lakatos, Laudan, van Fraasen and many others undermined everything we thought we understood about “how science works.”  Even Osborne’s short list begs many questions about scientific reasoning – i.e., what is meant by a law of nature?  Scott is living in the 1940s and needs a refresher course in how science works.  She needs to learn about abductive reasoning (used extensively by Stephen Meyer in Signature in the Cell).  She also needs a refresher course in logic so that she does not make self-refuting statements, like stating the ideology that methodological naturalism is not an ideology, or claiming that science cannot refer to the supernatural, but then employing reason to make that claim, when reason is not made of particles or forces, and refers to logical truths that are universal, timeless, necessary and certain.    Eugenie Scott needs to go take classes in Philosophy of Science and Elementary Logic, particularly in how not to be inconsistent.  Her definition of science includes testing multiple hypotheses, as long as the hypothesis selection process can exclude ones she doesn’t like.  Her science is fine with natural causes, as long as she can dip into the supernatural causes she needs, like logic and reason.  Her science is open-ended, as long as she can close off the ends she doesn’t like.  Her science lacks dogmatism, as long as she can be dogmatic about the parts she wants to be dogmatic about.  Her science is fine with peer review, as long as the pool of peers is protected against the peers she doesn’t like.  Her science is fine with replicating results, as long as she doesn’t have to replicate the parts she can’t, like universal common descent.  Her science believes in following the rules of “how science works,” as long as she and her totalitarian Darwin Party hacks get to make the rules.  Is this the kind of shallow, uninformed, na�ve, partisan, illogical thinking that should be representing science education at school boards?  Do a good deed for your country: send the NCSE back to school.(Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Pluto, Charon Details Trickle In

first_img(Visited 34 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 New photos from Pluto and Charon continue to show enigmatic features.Pluto’s North PoleAstrobiology Magazine posted a very detailed, color-enhanced image taken by New Horizons of the northern regions of Pluto, where deep canyons rival the largest in the solar system. One canyon is estimated to be 45 miles across; two others are six miles across. Click the image on the New Horizons page to appreciate the beauty of the full-resolution image.Pluto’s north polar regionCredit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research InstituteAlso puzzling are pits 45 miles across and 2.5 miles deep, seen at the lower right.Large, irregularly-shaped pits reach 45 miles (70 kilometers) across and 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) deep, scarring the region. These pits may indicate locations where subsurface ice has melted or sublimated from below, causing the ground to collapse.The color and composition of this region – shown in enhanced color – also are unusual.  High elevations show up in a distinctive yellow, not seen elsewhere on Pluto.  The yellowish terrain fades to a uniform bluish gray at lower elevations and latitudes. New Horizons’ infrared measurements show methane ice is abundant across Lowell Regio, and there is relatively little nitrogen ice.  “One possibility is that the yellow terrains may correspond to older methane deposits that have been more processed by solar radiation than the bluer terrain,” said Will Grundy, New Horizons composition team lead from Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona.Geology enthusiasts will appreciate a preliminary geology map constructed by the team showing features on the smooth region called Sputnik Planum.Charon, Nitrogen ThiefA freezing ocean that apparently swelled and cracked the crust of Pluto’s large moon Charon has been compared by Space.com and the New Horizons team to the Incredible Hulk busting through his shirt. And if Pluto’s canyon’s are impressive, consider the odd finding that this moon, just a fourth the diameter of its parent, sports a canyon 1,100 miles long and 4.5 miles deep.Another post on Space.com provides background information about Charon, including how it got its name. The little moon steals material from Pluto’s atmosphere:New Horizons revealed an unusual feature, a surprising red formation at Charon’s northern pole. This reddish hue comes from Pluto’s atmosphere. Pluto itself is too small to hold onto its atmosphere for its lifetime, so the nitrogen, methane and carbon monoxide leave the surface. Close-orbiting Charon captures some of the material, which is then funneled toward the surface. As the material collects, galactic cosmic rays and ultraviolet light from the sun interact to create tholins, complex compounds that form through the irradiation of simple organic compounds.Both Pluto and Charon may have had liquid oceans under their crusts, the article says.Next Stop for New HorizonsThe New Horizons team has selected a Kuiper Belt Object named 2014 MU69 for its next encounter. If all goes well, the spacecraft will buzz by this small object in January 2019. It’s only a fuzzy speck from Earth. Depending on its surface brightness, 2014 MU69 could be just 1% the size of Pluto.History in the making! These are exciting times to watch new discoveries come in from distant parts of the solar system. Stay tuned for more surprises as data from the Pluto flyby continue to trickle in over the next few months.last_img read more

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Stardust for Kabaddi

first_imgAishwarya with husband Abhishek, owner of Jaipur Pink Panthers, during the eventAishwarya Rai Bachchan with Shah Rukh Khan during the opening ceremony of Pro Kabaddi League in Mumbai on SaturdaySachin Tendulkar and wife Anjali with Amitabh BachchanA victorious UMumba team after beating Jaipur Pink Panthers 45-31 in the opening match of the tournamentFarah Khan and Boman Irani (Pics by Milind Shelte/India Today)last_img

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