Student creates Habitat for Humanity chapter at SMC

first_imgSaint Mary’s students volunteered their time to build walls for “Women Build,” a project by Habitat for Humanity. Junior Kay Thursby started a Saint Mary’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity and she — along with other Saint Mary’s students — participated in the project as their first event.Thursby said in an email that Habitat for Humanity has always been an instrumental part of her life.“I have been involved with Habitat for Humanity since high school,” she said. “I was really involved in my high school youth group at Old St. Pat’s in Chicago, and we went on service trips every summer. After I graduated, I served as the intern for the youth group and helped plan and execute these service trips. “I have been doing that the last three summers and have coordinated with over six Habitat for Humanity affiliates. [Habitat for Humanity] is by far my favorite non-profit.”Thursby has always wanted to help the St. Joseph chapter of Habitat for Humanity, she said. But in order to do so, she had to establish a chapter of Habitat for Humanity at Saint Mary’s. “Ever since freshman year, I have always wanted to become involved with the St. Joseph Affiliate, but just never really seemed to have the time to do it,” she said. “This year, I came knowing that I was going to volunteer, but quickly discovered that there wasn’t a campus chapter here, but there was a strong desire to have it. So, I decided to take it upon myself and start it.” Habitat for Humanity is about improving the lives of those in need as well as the lives of everyone in the community, Thursby said.“Habitat for Humanity is an extremely important non-profit because of their commitment to truly bettering society,” she said. “People often think of charity work as just giving things away and this isn’t true, especially with [Habitat for Humanity]. Homeowners are required to volunteer hundreds of hours in order to receive a home, and I think that this is extremely important, not only in the efficiency of Habitat, but also in the sense of ownership the homeowners truly feel. It’s a tough and long process of obtaining a Habitat house, but, based on every testimony from homeowners I have talked to, it’s always worth it.”The Saint Mary’s students involved in the new chapter participated in their first ever event Saturday to help “Women Build,” an event that began with a group women who wanted to build and provide affordable housing for everyone. “Women Build is a Habitat for Humanity-wide event in which every affiliate picks a homeowner and the whole construction of their home has to be completed — at the very minimum — by 60 percent of women,” she said. “On Saturday, we constructed all the walls for the home. We put together over thirty-five walls with some other volunteers. It was really inspiring and rewarding actually being able to see the work we did. As our first chapter event, it was a major success.”Junior Morgan Klein was one of the volunteers who helped with Women Build. She said she had never been exposed to Habitat to Humanity before, but when Thursby started a campus chapter, she found more information and became excited about finding a new way to serve the community. “It’s a really amazing way to give back to the community,” Klein said. “A lot of students are always looking for new ways to serve and [Habitat for Humanity] is a great way to help people and spend meaningful time doing something that can make everyone’s life better.”Thursby said the volunteers are the reason Habitat for Humanity can help so many people. “Without volunteers, Habitat for Humanity would not be nearly as successful as they are,” she said. “They truly rely on volunteers, so there would be so many less people living in affordable housing without [Habitat for Humanity] and its volunteers.”Sophomore volunteer Micaela Petrarca said in an email that she is proud of the Saint Mary’s Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. “I’m proud of our president Kay Thursby for making this club and introducing Habitat to me,” Petrarca said.“It’s an amazing organization and I’m so happy to be a part of it now.”All students are welcome to join the Saint Mary’s Chapter of Habitat for Humanity, Thursby said. “Any and all students are more than welcome to become members of our campus chapter,” she said. “It’s never too late to become involved, and the more members we have, the more work we can do.” Tags: charity, habitat, habitat for humanity, volunteer, women buildlast_img read more

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U.S. Army South Hosts State Partnership Program Conference

first_imgBy By Major Jamelle Garner January 31, 2017 Eight state adjutant generals, five assistant adjutant generals, seven deputy joint chiefs of staff, one Army National Guard deputy director, 15 command sergeants major, and a host of military delegates convened at the Mission Training Complex to discuss a multitude of topics. The SPP involves 20 U.S. states/territories partnered with 23 countries within Latin America and the Caribbean. “The purpose of the event is to achieve unity of effort among Army components in the SOUTHCOM area of operations. Our goals are to share information through senior leader engagement, address operational focus and to discuss future requirements and synchronize the land forces community of interest in the area,” said Major General K.K. Chinn, U.S. Army South commander. In this program National Guard units, like the South Carolina National Guard, are paired with another country’s military organization, such as Colombia in this example. Through these partnerships the two militaries work together to achieve enduring and mutually beneficial security goals, exchange military skills and experience, and share in defense knowledge. Previous examples of military cooperation in action include; the Suriname/South Dakota ‘women in the military subject matter expert exchange’ in March 2016 when best practices and ideas were exchanged on the importance of women in the military. The discussion topics included physical fitness, maternity leave and career advancement. Other exchange opportunities took place in 2016 including a Delaware National Guard and Trinidad and Tobago event when engineers from the Defence Force and U.S. Embassy personnel collaborated to rehabilitate a school that doubles as a disaster relief center for approximately 1,000 citizens. Most recently, the Georgia National Guard was selected as the U.S. partner for the Republic of Argentina in November 2016. Not unfamiliar with the program or a partnership, the Georgia National Guard will also maintain their previous partnership with the country of Georgia with whom they’ve partnered since 1994. “The SPP allows us to leverage the deep and trusting ties the National Guard has built with a very large group of foreign allies across every combatant command,” said U.S. Air Force General Joseph L. Lengyel, chief, National Guard Bureau. “I’m confident the Georgia National Guard and Argentina will both benefit from the extraordinarily rich tapestry of skills and experience each will bring to this partnership.” This year’s conference included briefs from every state on the lessons learned from 2016, planned events for fiscal year 2017, discussions on the events supporting the southern command and Army South lines of efforts and the long range plan for each state/partner for the next three to five years. Connecticut, paired with Uruguay, spoke about the value and importance in defense support to civil authorities and the relevance of having a flexible and responsive force in times of crisis. Planned events between the two militaries for 2017 include a scheduled mission planned for August 2017 in which 40 Infantry Soldiers will travel to Uruguay with a focus on the Mission Essential Task List skills. The SPP conference concluded Jan. 19 with more than 150 delegates in attendance returning to their respective states armed with new ideas, networks and guidance moving into 2017.last_img read more

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Four Argos Named to All-GSC Teams

first_img Share Four Argos Named to All-GSC Teams April 20, 2007PENSACOLA, Fla. – The Gulf South Conference announced the 2007 All-GSC Men’s Golf Team today. West Florida had a league high four players selected to this year’s squad. Matthew Galloway (Valrico, Fla. / Durant HS), David Lingmerth (Tranas, Sweden), and Federico Damus (Posadas, Argentina) were named to the first team. Matthew Berzovich (Longwood, Fla. / Lake Brantley HS) were named to the second team.Galloway has posted five top 10 finishes this year. He has a 71.77 stroke average, which ranks sixth in the NCAA II. Lingmerth posted three top 10 finishes this year, with a 72.06 stroke average. He is ranked ninth in the NCAA II. Lingmerth won the Southeastern Collegiate. Damus posted four top 10 finishes this year, with a 72.78 stroke average. He is ranked 22nd in the NCAA II. Damus won the Nova Southeastern Fall Classic. Berzovich has a stroke average of 73.88. He is ranked 16th in the south region.Seven golfers were named to the first and second teams. This is the first year the All-GSC Teams were selected based on achievements made throughout the 2006-07 season. Previously, golfers made the team based on where they finished in the GSC Tournament. Galloway made the first team last year with his first place finish. Damus finished in a tie for 15th.The GSC Coach of the Year will be awarded to the head coach of the team that wins the GSC Tournament held this Monday and Tuesday, April 23-24 in Hot Springs, ArkPrint Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Wellington Police Notes: Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015

first_imgWellington Police notes for Thursday, February 19, 2015•1:50 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a cell phone in the 200 block S. Elm, Wellington.•2:25 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 900 block N. Blaine, Wellington.•2:35 p.m. Officers investigated aggravated assault by a known suspect in the 600 block S. Woodlawn, Wellington.•Juvenile male, 15, Wellington was detained and referred to juvenile court.•4:01 p.m. Officers took a report of a child in need of care in the 500 block N. Woodlawn, Wellington.•5:07 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1000 block w. College, Wellington.•6:39 p.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to property and discharge of a firearm in the Wellington city limits by a known subject in the 200 block S. Fair, Wellington.last_img read more

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England Golf supports new professionals with tournament starts

first_img27 Apr 2018 England Golf supports new professionals with tournament starts Three new professionals are being supported by England Golf’s Give Back agreement with a series of starts on the European Challenge Tour.Josh Hilleard (pictured), Bradley Moore and Sean Towndrow will each get England Golf invitations to seven tournaments during 2018.In return they’ll give back a proportion of their winnings, over a certain amount, to the England Players Fund which supports players of the future.All three players came through England Golf national squads and were leading internationals in their amateur days.Moore, 20, from Kedleston Park, Derbyshire, begins his campaign this week at the Turkish Airlines Challenge. Hilleard, 23, from Farrington Park, Somerset, starts at next week’s Challenge de Espana. Towndrow 27, from Southport & Ainsdale, Lancashire, will take up his first start in the following week at the Open de PortugalThe Give Back scheme started two years ago and players who have been supported include double European amateur Ashley Chesters, Brabazon Trophy champions Ben Stow and Jamie Bower, English Amateur champion Nick Marsh and Ashton Turner who represented GB&I in the Jacques Leglise Trophy.The players’ provisional schedules are:Josh HilleardMay 3-6 Challenge De EspanaMay 17-20 Andalucia – Costa del Sol Match Play 9June 21-24 SSE Scottish Hydro ChallengeJuly 5-8 Prague Golf ChallengeJuly 26-29 Euram Bank Open, AustriaAugust 9-12 Vierumaki Finnish ChallengeSeptember 6-9 Bridgestone Challenge, Luton Hoo, EnglandBradley Moore26-29 April Turkish Airlines ChallengeMay 10-13 Open de PortugalJuly 5-8 Prague Golf ChallengeAugust 2-5 Swedish Challenge hosted by Robert KarlssonAugust 30-September 2 Cordon Golf Open, FranceSeptember 6-9 Bridgestone Challenge, Luton Hoo, EnglandOctober 4-7 Irish ChallengeOctober 4-7 Irish ChallengeSean TowndrowMay 10-13 Open de PortugalMay 31- June 3 Swiss ChallengeJune 14-17 Hauts de France Golf OpenJune 28-July Made in Denmark ChallengeAugust 2-5 Swedish Challenge Hosted by Robert KarlssonAugust 16-19 Northern Ireland OpenSeptember 6-9 Bridgestone Challenge, Luton Hoo, EnglandImage copyright Leaderboard Photography Tags: Challenge Tour, England Golf, Give Backlast_img read more

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The Marston Center Celebrates Lucky 13

first_imgSubmitted by Leslie Demich for The Marston CenterThe Marston CenterBasking in the shade of aspen, Douglas fir and cedar, the beautiful Marston Center in Lacey is marking its 13th anniversary this month.  With almost 40 independent health and wellness practitioners, The Marston Center has become a regional healing Mecca over the years.“We have attracted a quality and diversity of expertise among our practitioners that is unavailable elsewhere in the area,” according to Randy Marston, co-owner of the building and personal coach.Clients from as far away as Mount Vernon, Seattle and Bremerton make their way to The Marston Center for expert care ranging from mental health counseling to massage, and from acupuncture to nutrition counseling.  There’s even a hair salon and a personal trainer on site.“We started The Marston Center with a vision of warmth and welcome for practitioners and their clients,” building owner and personal coach Randy Marston said.  “The décor, the building layout and design, even the parking lot are all arranged to create a sense of calm and ease.”Practitioners located in the center especially appreciate owners Randy and Michael Marston.  Some have been a part of The Marston Center from the start.  They attribute much of their satisfaction with the location to the mindset of the owners.“They don’t require a lease, yet they guarantee the rent for three years,” according to massage therapist Todd McLendon.  “There’s free internet and free utilities – even free use of the building equipment, including the copy machine, fax and laundry facilities.”“They brought in a professional painter to prepare my office to my specifications at no cost to me,” reports Cathy Rivers, an expert leadership coach specializing in Human Design™.  “I work with clients all over the country by phone and internet, but having an inviting office where I can meet face-to-face with local clients means the world to me.”“The work I do is very unusual, so I rely entirely on word-of-mouth marketing,” says Jin Shin Jyutsu Practitioner and Instructor Leslie Demich.  “The cross referral opportunities here at The Marston Center have contributed significantly to the growth of my client base.”The offices in The Marston Center are in such demand there is often a waiting list, but tenants say it’s worth it.  “I wouldn’t want my office to be anywhere else,” says mental health therapist Juanita Evans.  “It’s quiet, but really friendly.  Just right for my clients.”The Marston Center is located at 677 Woodland Square Loop SE, Lacey, WA, near St. Martin’s University and the the new east campus of South Puget Sound Community College.  Businesses interested in relocating to The Marston Center can reach Randy Marston at 360-352-9443. Facebook65Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Truth Behind The Glam

first_imgNew business grows from struggle with breast cancerBy Michele J. KuhnRED BANK – When it comes to the signature color for breast cancer, Elio Ventrella wishes there was a little bit of blue mixed in with all that pink for men like him.The 33-year-old Ventrella, the owner of theGLAMbar on Broad Street, is a five-year breast cancer survivor. He was diagnosed May 17, 2007, after feeling strange. “I don’t know how to put it,’’ he said. “I was eating a lot and perspiring … I had swollen lymph nodes.”When his primary care doctor told him it was an infection, “I said no, something else is wrong.” When the doctor declined to send him on for further tests or examinations, the then-Staten Island resident made an appointment at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.Ventrella said his father, grandfather and an aunt all died from cancer. His grandmother is a breast cancer survivor.“They did a full workup,” he said. And when the results came in, his doctor sat him down. “He started out by calling me Mr. Ventrella when he had been calling me Elio… He told me I had breast cancer.“They told me they had to treat it aggressively… It was Stage 3 from what they could tell. It was life or death,’’ Ventrella said.“I thought it was a joke. I was just getting my life back…I had had a bad breakup and I kind of lost myself for a while and I was just getting myself back,” he said when learned of his diagnosis. Ventrella left the doctor’s that day promising to make appointments with specialists but instead ignored the fact he had breast cancer.For four months, he said, he “put it aside. I didn’t deal with it at all.” He didn’t even tell his family or friends. He admits he was scared and also afraid of how he would look after surgery. He feared being disfigured. “I was very vain…very, very vain, but I also didn’t want to die. Dying is still my biggest fear,” he said.He finally began looking for an oncologist and a plastic surgeon who specialized in men with breast cancer, a task that proved to be problematic. “There are no plastic surgeons for men with breast cancer… Being a man with breast cancer makes you feel you are alone with no one to help you,” he said.Less than 1 percent of all breast cancers occur in men and those who do get breast cancer are generally between 60 and 70 years old, according to statistics from the National Institute of Cancer at the National Institutes of Health website.While researching, Ventrella said he found three doctors – in California, Texas and Florida – who would perform reconstructive surgery on men with breast cancer. He chose the Florida doctor. He had “extremely aggressive” surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami to remove his right breast and then underwent reconstruction. He didn’t expect to have chemotherapy or radiation. But when tests of lymph nodes taken from his armpit and right arm during surgery came back as positive for cancer, he was put on a regimen of chemo and radiation, eight weeks on, four weeks off and then eight weeks on again, he said.During the off days when he felt well enough, he would go to spas for facials and massages. He met a cadre of about 14 women who befriended him. He would forget about his problems for a while as he listened to them complain about the spa and beauty services they got and how they never really knew what it was going to cost until they were leaving the building. It was those friendships – he still keeps in contact with six or seven of those women – that helped him see a market for theGLAMbar, a blow-dry bar and makeup business which opened in March at 116 Broad St.Two years after battling the disease alone, Ventrella finally told his family and friends about having breast cancer. Since then they have been with him as he has battled complications, including a stomach infection, procedures to build up his arm and then the rupture of that work that occurred during a work accident. He has had a total of 32 surgeries, the last in 2010, he said.While recuperating, he came to live in Red Bank where the person he was seeing had a summer home. “I saw Red Bank as a safe haven. No one knew me here and I could be normal.’’After losing his love for his job in merchandise branding with a major department store, he decided to open a business for women. “I didn’t research it… I did my legal work with LegalZoom (an Internet legal document site) and went to a real estate agent.“This was the first building I saw. I saw 22 (all over New Jersey) and I came back here,” he said. “I felt at home here.”Ventrella is a supporter of the Paint the Town Pink campaign. He said he would like to bring some makeup and a few of his “glamologists” to area hospitals and help make breast cancer patients feel better about themselves.Ventrella expects to grow his business to other areas and is already working on a second version of theGLAMbar.After coming through his ordeal, he’s cautiously optimistic. “I’m OK.”last_img read more

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Portrait of a Rumson Artist

first_imgBy Bernadette Hogan |RUMSON – For artist Lori Oakes a backyard shed is not a place to store things. It’s a place to make things.Inside her little outbuilding on Forrest Avenue exists a world of art. The walls are papered with published projects and storyboard sketches. Sealed egg cartons keep an assortment of oil paints from drying out and cardboard carriers hold brushes, scissors and glue. A giant Mac computer dominates her desk.“I’m not a ‘realistic artist.’ ” said Oakes during a tour of the sunlit studio, where rock music played softly. “I like thinking of a funny situation, something animated and exciting, and then developing characters.”“But you should learn the rules first and then experiment. For someone like me, I work best that way, by experimenting.”Years ago, with local artist Evelyn Leavens of Red Bank, Oakes dabbled in cel animation. She doodled and created characters inspired by Dr. Seuss, Disney and Peanuts.Oakes attended the Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia, taking courses in design, painting and illustration. A senior year experience made her realize how she wanted to share her art.“I interned with a school for the deaf in one of the Philly suburbs. I’ll never forget how I used to walk into a cafeteria filled with students with hands flying, lighting up the room,” Oakes remembers. “I illustrated my own interpretation of Jack and the Beanstalk and the book was printed and used in the school.”The picture book spoke for itself, delivering the fairy tale’s message without words. “That experience was incredible, and it was then I thought, ‘Wow you can use your art to help others.’ ”She turned that love into a profession.For many years Oakes worked out of a professional studio in Red Bank, collaborating with other design and advertising agencies, notably McCann-Corbran Advertising and Design, formerly of Fair Haven. She worked on projects for the Ringling Brothers, AT&T and developed the firstaid character Maxwell the Mouse for Riverview Medical Center. She designed logos for local businesses like Brennan’s Delicatessen and Cups & Cakes.But in her other job as a Forrest Avenue crossing guard, Oakes continued to draw inspiration from children. She drew little girls in mismatched polka dot outfits with cowgirl boots, hair swinging in ponytails, and huddles of boys heading back with her sons from basketball practice. The characters and storylines began appearing all over everyday life. She enjoyed observing the way her sons, John and Tommy Oakes, viewed the world.Around that time, Oakes was also helping a close family friend write and illustrate a story for his daughter, when she decided, “This is what I want to do.”She embarked on a series of children’s stories with her neighbor, Siobhan Fallon Hogan, (this reporter’s mother) to teach kids about the environment, self-acceptance and following dreams. The team has published two out of five stories, “Suzy the Scene” and “Peter the Polluter.” Their next book will focus on the distractions of texting.“Each book has a lesson,” Oakes says. “It’s simple and poignant.”Each book has a theme, too, about respecting the planet and using your unique talent to live up to your potential.This article was first published in the Around Town: Rumson special section in the March 8-15, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Riders rebound to square Kootenay Final with 5-2 win

first_imgThe Nelson Daily SportsThe Fernie Ghostriders struck for three first period goals en route to a 5-2 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Castlegar Rebels in Kootenay Conference playoff action Tuesday in the East Kootenay City.The win evens the best-of-seven final at 1-1. Castlegar won the opening game of the series 8-4 Monday. Game three is Thursday in Castlegar.Former Nelson Leaf Connor McLaughlin, 48 seconds in to the game, Cale Wright and Alex Milhouse scored in the opening frame to put the host team in the driver’s seat.Castlegar twice scored short handed but both times the Riders answered with goals of their own.Scott Morriseau, who finished the game with three points, scored twice for Fernie while Spencer Brodt and Tyler Robinson replied the Murdoch Division winners.Luke Richardson and Jeff Zmurchyk each had two points for Fernie.Fernie out shot the Rebels 41-22. Andrew Walton rebounded from a poor performance in game one to register the win in goal.Alex Ross took the loss in goal for Castlegar.Fernie played the game without sniper Thomas Abenante who was handed a one game suspension after game one of the series for a checking from behind penalty late in the game.
 Okanagan series resumes WednesdayThe Osoyoos Coyotes and Revelstoke Grizzlies are back in action for game three Wednesday at the Forum in Revelstoke.The teams split the opening two games in the South Okanagan City.The Grizz won the opener with the Dogs winning game two in overtime.Game four is set for Thursday in [email protected]last_img read more

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Selkirk Saints score BCIHL Three-Peat with sweep of SFU Clan

first_imgThe Selkirk Saints accomplished what no other team has done in the BC Intercollegiate Hockey League — score a Three-Peat.The Saints swept out Simon Fraser University Clan 4-2 Saturday night in Castlegar to capture the schools third consecutive BCHIL banner before a boisterous crowd.Goals by Jamie Vlanich and Ryan Edwards 90 seconds apart in the second period snapped a 1-1 tie to power the home side to the victory.The game, coupled with a 3-1 decision Friday, completed the best-of-three series sweep 2-0.The series win was the second time in three seasons Selkirk has defeated SFU to win the title.The first time came in 2013 in Nelson.In 2014 Selkirk defeated Trinity Western University to capture the crown. Thomas Hardy, third star in the contest, put Selkirk on the board during a penalty-filled first period, finishing a fine individual effort with a backhand goal from the slot.The goal marked his team’s first successful power-play effort following a 0-for-6 performance in Game 1.Jared Eng replied for SFU early in the second period, as the Clan played their strongest hockey early in the middle frame.But the Clan couldn’t solve Saints netminder James Prigione, paying the price when a pair of BCIHL rookies snapped home goals to give Selkirk a 3-1 advantage after 40 minutes.The two Kootenay International Junior Hockey League stars, Vlanich and Edwards, scored late in the frame.Vlanich was named the game’s first star.In the third Saints defenceman Ryan Procyshyn iced the game with a goal into the empty net.SFU forward Adam Callegari scored with 20 seconds left on the clock, but the result was no longer in doubt.Prigione, selected star number two, picked up his fourth straight postseason win with a 23-save effort while Jordan Liem took the loss in the nets for SFU despite playing a strong game for the second time in as many nights.Final shots were 28-25 Selkirk.With files from BCIHL website.last_img read more

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